John Daly – [Plot E-24; Unreadable] ADOPTED

Daly_John(SM)

 

Died 3/05/1884, aged 49.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

John Daily  (Confederate)

Enlistment:
- Enlisted as Private

Mustering information:
- Enlisted into 2nd Battn Cav (Maryland)

Sources for the above information:
- Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records

 

69) http://alexanderstreet.com/resources/civilwar.access.htm

 

 

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Pvt. John S. Damar – [Plot B-97; Unreadable] ADOPTED

Damar_John_S(SM)

 

Died 8/01/1897, aged 55.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

John S. Damar  (Confederate)

Enlistment:
- Enlisted as Private

Mustering information:
- Enlisted into 1st Light Artillery (Maryland)

Sources for the above information:
- Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records

 

69) http://alexanderstreet.com/resources/civilwar.access.htm

 

 

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J_W_Daniels

J.W. Daniels – [Plot D-51; Readable] ADOPTED

 

Buried 7/23/1863, aged 22.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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R_M_Daniels

R.M. Daniels – [Plot D-05; Barely Readable] ADOPTED

 

Buried 12/23/1864.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Pvt. J.E. Davidson – [Plot G-08; Unreadable] ADOPTED

Davidson_J_E(sm)

 

Died 1/05/1896.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

J. E. DAVIDSON, G-08, N/A Co. A, Davis Cav. Bn

 

1870 US Federal Census-MD-Balto. Independent City- W16

 

 

Laughton, William

30

Bookkeeper

NC

 

Laughton, Mary

30

 

VA

 

John E. Davidson

25

Bookkeeper

VA

 

Joseph E. Davidson

22

clerk in store

VA

 

Margaret E. Davidson

47

 

VA

 

 

 

 

 

 

1880 US Federal Census-Baltimore-Baltimore-D198

 

 

Shriver, Henry C.

53

Sign Painter

NJ PA NJ

 

Shriver, Hannah S.

46

 

MD PA MD

Wife

Shriver, Charles B.

22

Clerk in store

MD NJ MD

Son

Shriver, Harry

20

Clerk in ? house

MD NJ MD

Son

Davidson, Ella F.

24

 

MD NJ MD

Daughter

Davidson, Joseph E.

34

Clerk in store

VA VA VA

Son-in-law

Davidson, Virginia P.

12-Jul

 

MD VA MD

 

 

 

The (Baltimore) Sun, 6 Jan 1896-Mortuary Notice

DAVIDSON-On January 5, JOSEPH E. DAVIDSON, of this city.  He was a Confederate soldier and served in Major Davis’s Battalion of Maryland Cavalry. (VA papers please copy)

Funeral at 3 P.M. on the 7th instant from his late residence No. 1113 North ?Fulton avenue. Interment private.

 

The (Baltimore) Sun, 6 January 1896

Joseph E. Davidson

   Mr. Joseph E. Davidson, aged forty-seven years, died Saturday of gastritis at the home of his brother-in-law, Mr. William H. Laughter, 302 West Lanvale street, after an illness of seven months.  He had been for a number of years a floor waiter in the employ of Mabley & Carew.  Mr. Davidson was a son of Rev. Joseph P. Davidson, a Methodist minister, of Richmond, Va.  When a boy of seventeen he entered the war as a Confederate soldier and served in Major Davis’s battalion of Maryland Cavalry.

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

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Pvt. Jacob N. Davis – [Plot E-34; Unreadable] ADOPTED

Davis_Jacob_N(sm)

 

Pvt., Co. A, 2nd Md. Inf. Res. of Clear Springs, Washington Co., Md. Enl. Richmond 8/31/62. WIA (through left hand) and captured Gettysburg 7/3/63. In Cavalry Corps hospital, Gettysburg. Sent to Ft. McHenry. Transf. Point Lookout. Escaped 12/8/63. Ab. on sick leave 2/28/64. Present 3/31/64. WIA Weldon R. R. 8/19/64. Ab. wounded in Richmond hospital same day. Died of wounds, date unknown. Bur. Oakwood Cem. Rebur. Loudon Park Cem., Baltimore 1874.

 

23) Driver, Page 398

 

Reburied from Gettsyburg, 1874.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

JACOB N. DAVIS, E-34, Co. A, 2nd MD Inf.

 

US Civil War Soldiers 1861-1865

Jacob N. Davis

Confederate MD

2 Battn MD Inf., Co. A

Rank in/out: Private

M379  roll 1

 

American Civil War Soldiers

Jacob Davis

Confederate  MD

Enlisted as a Private in Co. A, 2nd Inf. Reg. MD

 

I’m not sure if the following is the same person but the name is the same.

 

Civil War POW Records

Davis, Jacob N., Pvt., 1st Md Battn Co. A, Captured Aug. 24, 1863, sent to Pt. Lookout Sept 15, 1863

 

Davis, Jacob N., Date of confinement Aug. 24, 1863, confined by Genl. Morris, Sent to Pt. Lookout Sept. 15, 1863 as POW, 1st MD Batt. Co. A

 

US Letterman General Hospital Gettysburg, PA

Davis, Jacob N., Pvt., 1st Md Battn, Co. A., Captured July 5, 1863 at Gettysburg. Transferred to Provost Marshall Sept. 25, 1863

 

1850 US Federal Census, MD, Baltimore, Ward 8

 

David Whiting

62

laborer

MD

Harriet Davis

14

 

MD

Martha Davis

12

 

MD

Georgean

10

 

MD

John K. Davis

8

 

MD

Jacob N. Davis

6

 

MD

George W. Davis

4

 

MD

 

63)  Courtesy Ms. Ms. Lisa Lockett.

 

 

 

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John_J_Davis

Pvt. John J. Davis – [Plot H-11; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

Died 4/21/1904, aged 66.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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John Robinson Davis – [Plot D-74; Unreadable] ADOPTED

Davis_John_R(sm)

 

Pvt., Co. H (1st), 1st Md. Inf. On postwar roster. Probably John Robinson Davis who later served as Captain's Clerk on C.S.S. Florida. Res. of Baltimore. Member, Army & Navy Society, Maryland Line Association. d. 7/5/11. Bur. Loudon Park Cem., Baltimore.

 

23) Driver, Page 399

 

Born in Norfolk, VA, September 15, 1842. Enlisted April 1861 in Company H, First Virginia Infantry.

 

1) Toomey, Page 48

 

Died 7/05/1911, aged 69.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Robert Davis – [Plot B-41; Fairly Readable] ADOPTED

Davis_Robert(SM).jpg

 

 

Died 2/02/1870, aged 36.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

Robert Davis  (Confederate)

Enlistment:
- Enlisted as Private

Mustering information:
- Enlisted into E Company, 1st Battn Cav (Maryland)

Sources for the above information:
- Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records

 

69) http://alexanderstreet.com/resources/civilwar.access.htm

 

 

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William H. Davis – [Plot D-79; Barely Readable] ADOPTED

Davis_William_H(SM)

 

Died 3/20/1899, aged 77.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Pvt. Robert Alexander Dawson – [Plot F-40; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

Robert_Alexander_Dawson

Pvt., Co. E, 2nd Md. Inf. Res. of Trappe, Talbot Co., Md. Enl. 9/12/62. Present 3/31/64. Ab. sick in Danville or Liberty hospital 10/31/64. Present sick 2/28/65. Ab. sick with diarrhea in Richmond hospital 3/20/65. Captured in Jackson hospital, Richmond 4/3/65. d. of disease 4/24/65. Bur. Hollywood Cem. Rebur. Loudon Park Cem., Baltimore 1874.

 

23) Driver, Page 400

 

Reburied from Virginia, 1874.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Pvt. Dudley Dean – [Plot A-39; Barely Readable] ADOPTED

 

Dudley_Dean

Buried 6/07/1863.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 DUDLEY DEAN, Lot A-39, Co. H., 1 AL Cav

 

US Civil War Soldiers 1861-1865

 

Dudley Dean

Confederate  AL

1 AL Cav, Co. H.

Rank in/out: Private

 

American Civil War Soldiers

 

Dudley Dean

Confederate AL

Enlisted as a Private  Co. H.,  1st Cav. Reg. AL

 

Civil War Prisoner of War Records

 

Dean, Dudly, 1st AL Cav, Co. G, captured Middleton, TN  May 21, 1863. Forwarded to Nashville May 23, Louisville May 26 and sent to Baltimore May 29, 1863.

 

63)  Courtesy Ms. Ms. Lisa Lockett.

 

 

 

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Pvt. Charles Dearbach – [Plot F-78; Fairly Readable] ADOPTED

Dearbach_Charles_SM.jpg

 

Died 12/24/1900, aged 52.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Lt. Col. Paul François Joseph Bernard De Gournay – [Plot H-08; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

Well-born Lt. Col. Paul François de Gournay
was the South's adopted 'marquis in gray.'

By Mauriel Joslyn

In the pitch-black hours of March 14, 1863, the U.S. ironclad Essex made her first attempt to run the Confederate river batteries at Troth's Landing on the Mississippi River, three

DeGourney_Paul_F_J_B(SM)

miles below the Port Hudson wharfs. Covered by supporting fire from an escort fleet, she defiantly shelled what was thought to be an overwhelming Confederate force of heavy artillery. In actuality, the Confederate batteries of the 12th Louisiana Heavy Artillery numbered a mere three guns. But bold resolve made up for the cannon shortage, and under the able command of Lieutenant Colonel Paul François de Gournay, the battery returned fire, persuading Essex to beat a hasty retreat. The Zouave cannoneers cheered their victory, which had disabled and grounded two of Admiral David Farragut's fleet. It was after 5 a.m. on March 15 when the artillery duel ended.

The action at Troth's Landing was the first engagement with Federal forces that the 12th had seen since being assigned to Port Hudson nearly nine months earlier. Transferred from the Richmond theater, de Gournay arrived at Port Hudson to do what he and his battery did best-- build and defend fortifications.

Born into privilege in Brittany, France, as a marquis, de Gournay spent his early manhood in Cuba as a manager of his father's vest sugar plantations. In 1851 he became involved in the failed fight for Cuban independence that led to the execution of the insurgents. Under those circumstances, the young marquis left Cuba, choosing the familiarity of French New Orleans as his new home.

Louisiana proved a successful choice for de Gournay. He acquired land in the sugar cane region and served as editor of the Picayune in 1860. On the eve of war his estate in New Orleans was valued at $100,000. The marquis married, aged 33 and found himself comfortably situated in the city's ruling Creole society, which counted many transplanted Frenchmen like himself among its elite.

War fever reached New Orleans with Abraham Lincoln's call for troops, and Louisiana cast her lot with the Confederacy in January 1861, amid mass cheers and a call to arms. Troops immediately occupied Forts Jackson and St. Philip at the mouth of the Mississippi, and de Gournay resigned his newspaper position to enlist. "I went to [Ft. Jackson] as quartermaster to the Orleans Artillery," he wrote. That was the modest beginning of his military career in the Confederate Army. He saw in the cause of Southern independence the same principles that had led him to fight for Cuba.

De Gournay's chance for military recognition came when he heard that the legislature had voted for the formation of four companies of artillery. A subordinate officer, J.W. Minnich, described the inexperienced troops' first drill and the commander who led them: "Oh yes! We made an imposing array when drawn up in line on parade or on drill, and it was some drilling we were subjected to, believe me, and we became most proficient in the handling of our muskets and in the Zouave tactics, which were quite different in some respects from the Hardee or Upton tactics of the time. French was the official language, and the French as a nucleus made the task of getting us into shape easier than if we had had only English speakers. Our captain, de Gournay, spoke both languages, and was the most kindly, patient, considerate, and lenient of men. I shall always revere his memory. A strict disciplinarian, he was always as just to his men as a man can be."

De Gournay was proud of his well-drilled battalion, and once his troops were whipped into shape he had high hopes for reaching the front. "I made immediate application for a captaincy, and proceeded to form a company, many members of the Orleans Battalion enlisting with me," he wrote. "We were soon relieved by another command, and I resumed to New Orleans with nearly a full company of drilled artillerists, expecting to get my commission and go on active service without delay. I was mistaken. A young lawyer, with no military experience, but being the grandson of a Revolutionary hero, wished to raise a company. The cool alternative was offered me to join this gentleman as his first lieutenant, my men forming the nucleus of his company, or to receive a commission as captain of a second company, but I promptly refused both."

De Gournay considered the incident an insult, and that prickly attitude was a marked trait of the man. His Gallic sense of pride and fair play would assert itself over and over during the war.

As de Gournay was about to disband his company, which he himself had equipped for $10,000, friends dissuaded him. A fellow countryman, Colonel Alfred Coppens, then approached de Gournay with an offer. Coppens had just received authorization to raise a battalion of infantry, outfitted in the uniform of the French Zouaves, the first officially raised by the fledgling Provisional Army of the Confederate States. Coppens asked de Gournay to join him, and the Orleans Independent Artillery left New Orleans in March 1861, bound for Pensacola, Fla.

De Gournay was disappointed at being assigned to an infantry regiment as light artillery. But the opportunity meant action, and as every company commander in Louisiana was pulling political strings to get sent to Virginia, at least Pensacola was a stepping stone.

Upon arrival in Florida, under the command of General Braxton Bragg, de Gournay was informed that light infantry was not entitled to a battery of artillery. Disappointment loomed again, but since the young men were trained artillerists, Bragg (himself a former artilleryman) instead assigned them to construct and man fortifications at Warrington Harbor. The assignment was carried out so well that it won de Gournay and the Orleans Independent Artillery a coveted transfer to Virginia, to be placed under the command of Brig. Gen. John Magruder at Yorktown.

Their arrival was timely just as Maj. Gen. George McClellan's invasion of the peninsula was repulsed. Magruder, too, was a stroke of luck. As a former artillery officer, he saw a capable and highly efficient officer in the person of Captain Paul François de Gournay. Through Magruder's influence, de Gournay was awarded a majority and then was promoted to lieutenant colonel, and the Orleans Independent Artillery became the 12th Louisiana Heavy Artillery under its new commander. Its services not needed in Richmond, the unit, consisting of four companies, was dealt an ace in the fortunes of war and was sent to Port Hudson, La.

The garrison town on the Mississippi River was fortified as an outpost of the more important center of Vicksburg, which commanded the river and kept supply lines open.; Between Port Hudson and Vicksburg, cattle, food and provisions poured in from Texas to the blockaded Confederacy, making the Union occupation of New Orleans ineffective.

Troth's Landing had been a victory for the 12th Louisiana Heavy Artillery. The bluff accomplished its purpose, and Essex fumed tail and headed back downriver to New Orleans. Years later, de Gournay was amused to read that Union commander William D. Porter had reported finding Port Hudson "strongly fortified."

Due to such miscalculations of the garrison's strength, a tremendous Union offensive was planned against Port Hudson in April 1863, consisting of both land and water forces under the command of Union Maj. Gen. Nathaniel Banks, with a troop strength of over 30,000 men. At the same time the Union was building up strength against Port Hudson, the Confederate forces inside the fortress were given orders to evacuate, moving the troops to Vicksburg. Only 4,200 men remained in the trenches designed for 22,000. Among the last to leave was the garrison's commander, Brig. Gen. Franklin Gardner. Just as he rode out, he received word that Banks was on the way with land forces and Farragut had been sighted on the river with a fleet of gunboats. Gardner hastened back, and the garrison's fate was sealed. They must hold Port Hudson.

De Gournay's assignment was to do what he and his battalion did best, to work on fortifications and man the river batteries. He began by modifying the works, contracting the eight miles of defenses and taking advantage of good natural defensive ground to reduce the length of the port's trenches to 4 ½ miles. This was still too much to man with only 4,000 effectives. The river batteries consisted of only 19 heavy guns, including two Columbiads, one howitzer, one 42-pounder, and one 12-pounder rifled piece affectionately known as "the Baby." The remainder were mostly smoothbore 24-pounder Parrotts.

De Gournay held the left wing of the river defenses with 15 guns. His position was the hardest hit by the Union gunboat batteries. The total weight of metal that could be hurled upon an attacker at one time by the whole battery was 770 pounds, much less than one broadside from some of the ships Farragut sent against them.

In those dangerous circumstances, they waited. Banks was between them and Vicksburg. The outpost of Port Hudson had become an orphan, trapped and impossible to supply from the garrison at Vicksburg. The longest true siege in American history was underway. For 61 days, the Confederate forces inside the besieged post performed incredible tactical and strategic feats in the face of over whelming odds. Trenches that foreshadowed the nightmarish landscapes of World War I were perfected. Grenades were invented. Bombproofs were introduced into the art of warfare, and the barbed-wire entanglements that would later litter battlefields had their precursors here in piano wire obstacles. When the heavy artillery suffered broken carriages, the guns were mounted on railroad cars or propped up to keep them firing.

De Gournay was an innovative commander, shifting his troops to give the impression that the garrison was more heavily manned. "The breastworks were but poorly lined, and had the enemy succeeded in making a general assault on every point simultaneously, it would not have been possible to meet them with successful resistance," he noted. "But the nature of the ground around our works and the difficulty in bringing up large bodies of troops to time, militated in our favor, and the first attacking column was generally repulsed and routed ere the second could work its way to its point of attack. Our fellows then would double-quick to the right or left, as the case may be, and reinforce the point threatened, beat back the assailants, and run to another point of attack."

If guns were scarce, ammunition for them was even more so, and eventually the river batteries could not return fire--the shells were simply too precious to risk. Some of the cannoneers fed any kind of scrap iron available into their guns, and among the many reports of peculiar wounds was a Union soldier who was hit in the face by a remnant of an old French bayonet.

The siege dragged on through June. By the end of the month the food had run out, and the men were reduced to eating mule meat and rats. Incredibly, morale remained high. Although wounded, de Gournay noted in an official report on June 26: "There is still continual firing, and it is probable that the attack will be renewed tonight, preparatory to an attempt to charge the works in the morning. The men are in excellent spirits and will do all their duty."

The brave little band of defenders fought valiantly. When July 7 brought news of Vicksburg's surrender, it was received with disbelief. It was not until July 9 that the Port Hudson garrison finally accepted the truth and likewise agreed to surrender. Thus ended the siege, and with it the illustrious military career of Paul François de Gournay. The Union besiegers, who had lost more than 7,000 men, were shocked to see the small, half-starved force of 2,200 able-bodied Confederates drawn up for the surrender ceremony.

De Gournay wrote of the siege that history bypassed: "Voluntarily putting ourselves in the clutches of our enemy, we held him where we wanted him, and when the surrender came, after sixty-one days' tussle, it was brought about by the only contingency we had failed to consider, i.e., the fall of Vicksburg."

De Gournay and the 405 officers of the Port Hudson garrison were sent North as prisoners of war, incarcerated at several prisons before arriving at Fort Delaware in June 1864. There, de Gournay was selected for a special fate. He was one of 600 officers sent by the Union to Charleston Harbor to be placed under friendly fire, protecting the Union batteries on Morris Island. After 3 ½ months of brutal treatment, de Gournay was released from prison on a special exchange in December 1864. The war ended a few months later, and, aged 38, de Gournay was a grizzled veteran.

The marquis returned to France after the war. Two years later, he was back in America as the vice consul of France, and served seven years in that position, residing in Baltimore. Life for de Gournay became quiet and unassuming. He worked at scholarly pastimes--translating French works into English and teaching French-- and rented rooms in his house, all to earn money. He was editor of the Catholic Mirror, and also wrote for various newspapers, mostly articles on the war, particularly the Port Hudson campaign. De Gournay never forgot his loyalty to the Confederacy, and remained active in several veterans organizations. Forever proud of his Zouave cannoneers, he spoke fondly of them all his life.

On July 26, 1904, de Gournay died in Baltimore, aged 76. He was buried in the Confederate section of Loudoun Park Cemetery, with members of his veterans organizations. Although he was a relatively obscure figure in the Civil War, his sense of honor, capable leadership in the face of superior odds, and patriotic devotion to the Southern cause equaled or excelled that of many of the more famous personalities of the war.

http://www.latinamericanstudies.org/civil-war-cubans/degournay.htm

 

46) America’s Civil War Magazine, September 1995, Page 8 & 85-88.

 

 

Born ca. Feb. 1827, Brittany, France, of nobility. Title: Marquis De Gournay de Marcheville. As a young man went to Cuba to manage estates for father. Fought for that island during struggle for independence (1850-51). Came to New Orleans and was editor of Picayune when war began. Married Annette Octavia--, ca. l860; three children. 1860 census: New Orleans, LA; newspaper reporter; w/wife. Quartermaster to the Orleans Artillery at seizure of Ft. Jackson, LA. Raised and outfitted Orleans Independent Artillery at own personal expense. Commissioned CPT, 1861, in Co.E, 1st La.Zouaves. Sent to Pensacola by GEN. Bragg,1861, as attached to Coppens' Zouave Battalion; built and manned batteries at Warrington Harbor. Assigned to Yorktown, VA, 3 Oct 61. Promoted MAJ, 3 Jul 62. Promoted LTC, 31 Mch 63, of 12th La. Batt'n Heavy Arty. Transf'd to Port Hudson and arrived, 4 Sep 62. Surrendered at Port Hudson, 9 Jul 63. Sent to New Orleans on steamer Suffolk. Confined Customs House prison New Orleans. Sent to Governor's Island, New York, 26-28 Aug 63. Transf'd to Johnson's island, 13 Oct 63. Transf'd to Pt Lookout via Baltimore, 9 Feb 64. Transf'd to Ft.Delaware,23 Jun 64. Forw'd to Charleston, SC, 20 Aug 64. Transf'd to Ft Pulaski, GA, 21 Oct 64. Paroled from Fort Pulaski, 5 Dec 64. Many times commended for bravery. After war went back to France for two years. Returned to U.S. and lived in Baltimore where he served 7 years as Vice Consul to France. Member of Maryland Society of Army and Navy of the Confederacy (joined 1893).Taught French, translated books and wrote articles. Editor, Catholic Mirror. Baltimore (1870). Very scholarly and had exalted notions of personal honor. Remained a French citizen. Died 26 Jul 1904, after lengthy illness. Buried in Loudon Park Cem., Baltimore, MD.

http://www.latinamericanstudies.org/civil-war-cubans/degournay-1.htm

 

47) Mauriel Joslyn, The Biographical Roster of the Immortal 600 (White Mane Publishing Company, 1995), page 85.

 

 

 

The Daily Picayune (New Orleans)
September 10, 1851, page 2

The Creoles of Cuba

Since my return to this city I have been asked so many questions and have heard so many reports about Cuban affairs, that I believe it due to truth, to the memory of the martyrs in the Cuban cause, and to the Cuban people in general, to raise my voice, however humble and unknown, to state such facts as circumstances have given me special knowledge of.

I solemnly state that Gen. Lopez never deceived any one about the revolutionary feeling in Cuba, and the cooperation he hoped to meet from the Cubans. My position near him during the last eighteen months of his life, enables me to state knowingly that letters from all parts of the island have often called him and his friends, whatever might be their number. No letters or news have ever been forged in this city, and I am astonished that such an accusation could ever have been made against the few devoted friends, who, sincerely convinced of the goodness of the cause, have spared no effort, no sacrifice to serve it, and have engaged in it their time, their name and their fortune, with no guarantee than the word and honor of one man. These letters have never been written with the intention of deceiving: their only fault is exaggeration, not as regards the feelings and wishes of the Cuban people, but as to the possibility of immediate action. Circumstances have been against the expedition; the revolution had broken out on the 4th of July in Puerto Principe; from many points Patriots had started and concentrated in the Coscoro mountains, who were and are still defending themselves against the royal troops. The Government, of course, immediately expected the arrival of some expedition from the States, and took all necessary measures; arrests were made; the army of spies reinforced, and all suspicious men marked and closely watched. The General arrived. But few Cubans joined him, it is true, but how many tried to join? The jailers of Havana may answer that question by stating how many arrests were made on the roads since the 12th of August; they can answer it by telling what is the crime committed by over two thousand wretches now in Spanish dungeons or transported to Spain. The soldiers also will answer by saying how many have been executed behind the bushes of the Aguacate and the Pena Blanca!

Say that the Cubans are paralyzed by the system of terror under which they live; say that they are crushed by tyranny; that they lack resolute leaders, capable of forming a plan and of leading a people without arms, and surrounded by the most ingenious system of spies; accuse them of cowardly weakness, but do not cast infamy on their name by representing them fighting the Patriots, tracking with dogs the man who has been their only hope for two years.

I was in Cuba when Gen. Lopez arrived, and I will only say that had it been possible to join him, I would not now be in New Orleans; those who know me will not doubt my words. Now, while I am convinced, for having myself seen and heard what I say, and having been amongst the Cubans and exposed to the same dangers, I oblige nobody to share my convictions, but I will tell the incredulous, go to the island of Cuba, do not seek information in newspapers published under the most vigilant censorship, not amongst men who are interested in showing that the island is quiet, but mix with the Cubans, become their friend-let you observations be personal, and then try a little conspiracy. Only assemble and arm fifty men, I warrant you will find both men and money; but after that, if you are able, withdraw your hear from the noose in which you had already seen it, if you have resisted the trials of a conspirator's life, if you can escape, you will soon be back and will say with me, it must be seen to be believed or understood; this people has the will but not the power of moving.

It has not been my intention to get into a long discussion; I am no public writer, and it is with regret that I put my name before the public; but returning to New Orleans, I have been painfully affected by the revulsion which has taken place since the news of the defeat of theat heroic little party whose deeds will be long spoken of by the Spanish soldier, who, more generous than his Government, gives due credit to an enemy that only gave way to a force ten times stronger. I have heard accusations murmured against Gen. Lopez and his noble and generous friends, who feel less the loss of their fortunes, their name exposed to the attacks of vulgar enemies, than for the loss of a man who never had an unworthy thought, whose motives were pure and generous. Gen Lopes had honored me by his friendship and confidence. I grieve his loss as that of a father; and I think that raising my weak voice to justify him, his friends, of the cause for which he died, is to me a duty-is rendering a homage to his memory. Those who insult his ashes by calumnies are guilty of an act of cowardice, and I would be as guilty if I remained silent. I confidently hope that time will justify him in the eyes of the world, and that if I have not been able to save him, I may yet one day aid in avenging him. I have no personal interest engaged in the Cuban cause; my life is all I could give to it; and if I regret being obscure and unknown, it is only because a more elevated position would have given more weight to my words-words which are dictated by a sincere and well-convinced heart.

                                                                                                                                                                P.F. de Gournay
New Orleans, August [Sept.] 9, 1851

48) The Daily Picayune (New Orleans) September 10, 1851, page 2 http://www.latinamericanstudies.org/civil-war-cubans/degournay-2.htm

 

Died 7/23/1904, aged 76.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

B. F. DeGourney  (Confederate)

Enlistment:
- Enlisted as Lieutenant Colonel

Mustering information:
- Commissioned into Field and Staff, 12th Infantry (Louisiana)

Sources for the above information:
- Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records

 

69) http://alexanderstreet.com/resources/civilwar.access.htm

 

The (Baltimore) Sun, 27 July 1904-Mortuary Notice

                        COL. DE GOURNAY DEAD

Was a Marquis In France And A Brave Confederate

ALSO NEW ORLEANS EDITOR

Managed His Father’s Estates In Cuba As A Young Man-A Gentleman Of The Old School

 

   Col. Paul Francis de Gournay, a Frenchman of noble birth, a distinguished Confederate veteran and a classical scholar of note, died at 11:30 o’clock yesterday morning, after a lingering illness, at his home, 309 West Hoffman street.  He had been in ill health for over a year, but it was thought that his condition was improving, when a change for the worse set in a few weeks ago and he sank rapidly, baffling the physicians.

   Colonel de Gournay was the Marquis de de Gournay de Marcheville, and was born in Brittany about 78 years ago.  He owned and managed, through resident agents, extensive lands in France, which have been in his family for many years.  The best blood of the republic flowed in his veins, and he was accorded high station among the nobility of his native land.

   He came to this county from Cuba, where he managed his father’s estates when he was a young man, and he also fought for the island a cause and rendered distinguished service.  Coming to the United States, he located in New Orleans , and lived there for a number of years.  At the beginning of the Civil War Colonel de Gournay was the editor of the New Orleans Picayune.  When the war broke out he equipped at his own expense a company of artillery, of which he was the captain and upon offering the same and himself to the Confederate cause he was sent to join the army in Virginia.  He served gallantly at Yorktown where he constructed and manned the breastworks, and in the famous Seven Days Battle of June 1***.  He succeeded to the rank of major of artillery in the Army of Northern Virginia about the time General Johnston was wounded, and later he was transferred to the Southwest.  He was one of the defenders of Port Hudson and went through the terrible siege at that place, lasting about four months, being forced to capitulate only when on the verge of starvation.  Colonel de Gournay was severely wounded at Port Hudson, being struck in the breast by a piece of shell.  At this place he was taken prisoner and remained a prisoner of war to the end of the great struggle, being confined part of the time at Port Hudson and part at Johnson’s Island.  He was made lieutenant colonel, commanding a battalion, just before the fall of Vicksburg which precipitated the fall of Port Hudson.  He was many times commended for bravery during the war , and was regarded by his superior officers as one of the most efficient colonels of artillery in the army.

   At the close of the was Colonel de Gournay came to Baltimore, where he taught French and wrote for many out of town publications.  He was a very scholarly man and a gentleman of the old school, with the most exalted notion of personal honor as the distinguishing trait of the real gentleman.  For a short time he returned to France, spending only about two years there looking after his estates.  Returning to this city, he served for seven years as vice consul for France.  Several years ago he retired from the consular service, and had since been living the quiet life of a scholar and a teacher.  He was a member of the Maryland Society of the Army and Navy of the confederate States and also of Isaac R. Trimble Camp of Confederate Veterans.

   The funeral will take place tomorrow from the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, Rev. Thomas M. O’Donoghue officiating.  Capt. James R. Wheeler and the Maryland Line Confederate Veterans will have charge of the funeral arrangements.  Interment will be in Loudon Park Cemetery.

   Colonel de Gournay is survived by a widow and one daughter, Miss Blanche de Gournay.

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

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Austin_Nelson_Dempsey

Pvt. Austin Nelson Dempsey – [Plot I-02; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

Died 10/04/1906, aged 65.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

AUSTIN NELSON DEMPSEY,  I-02,  VA (Letcher Art)

 

US Civil War Soldiers 1861-1865

Austin N, Dempsey

Confederate VA

Capt. Brander’s Co., VA Light Arty (Letcher Arty)

Rank in/out: Private

M 382  roll 15

 

American Civil War Soldiers

Austin Dempsey

Residence: Baltimore, MD

Enlisted: 17 Feb 1862, Richmond, VA.

Confederate VA

Death: 4 Oct 1906

Enlisted as a private in Letcher Light Art. Reg. VA.

Deserted Letcher Light Art. Reg, Va, 15 March 1865

 

1880 US Federal Census- MD, Baltimore, District 68

 

 

Dempsey, Austin

35

Harness maker

MD  MD  MD

 

Dempsey, Emma

23

wife

MD  MD  MD

 

Dempsey, Virginia

4

daughter

MD  MD  MD

 

Dempsey, Tressia

3

daughter

MD  MD  MD

 

Dempsey, Josephine

1

daughter

MD  MD  MD

 

 

 

 

 

 

1890 Baltimore, MD Directory

 

 

 

Austin N. Dempsey

 

 

 

 

1720 Point Lane

 

 

 

 

Occupation: Harness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1900 US Federal Census-MD, Balto City (Ind, City), Ward 11, District 146

 

Dempsey, Austin

Feb 1846

54   M25yrs

MD  MD  MD

harness maker

Dempsey, Emma

Dec 1858

41   M25yrs

MD  NJ  PA

wife

Dempsey, Virginia

Oct 1877

22

MD  MD  MD

daughter

Dempsey, Teresa

Feb 1879

21

MD  MD MD

daughter

Dempsey, Josephine

Sept 1880

19

MD  MD  MD

daughter

Dempsey, Buleuh

Nov 1882

17

MD  MD  MD

daughter

Demspey, Grace

Aug 1885

14

MD  MD  MD

daughter

Staylor, Jennie

May 1846

54  widow

MD  MD  MD

sister

Norwood, Benjamin

Jan 1867

32  widow

MD  MD  MD

nephew

Norwood, Benjamin

Oct 1887

12

MD  MD MD

son

Norwood, Helen

Jan 1889

11

MD  MD  MD

daughter

 

63)  Courtesy Ms. Ms. Lisa Lockett.

 

 

 

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Sgt. Daniel Dendy – [Plot B-51; No Marker] ADOPTED

Dendy_Daniel(SM)

 

Died and buried 10/14/1864.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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John Frederick Dittus – [Plot C-87; Unreadable] ADOPTED

Dittus_John_Frederick(SM)

 

Died 4/17/1907, aged 67.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

JOHN FREDERICK DITUS, lot C-87, Co. C., 1 MD Cavalry

 

US Civil War Soldiers 1861-1865

F. Dittus

Confederate   Maryland

1 Reg  MD Cav

Alternate name: John F. Ditters

 

American Civil War Soldiers

John Ditters

Confederate  Maryland

Enlisted as Pvt. In Co. C., 1st Battn Cavalry Regiment MD

 

J. Fred. Dittus

Born: January 1843

Died: 17 April 1907

 

63)  Courtesy Ms. Ms. Lisa Lockett.

 

John F. Ditters  (Confederate)

Enlistment:
- Enlisted as Private

Mustering information:
- Enlisted into C Company, 1st Battn Cav (Maryland)

Sources for the above information:
- Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records

 

69) http://alexanderstreet.com/resources/civilwar.access.htm

 

 

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George_W_Dofflemyer

George Washington Dofflemyer – [Plot B-28; Barely Readable] ADOPTED

 

Died 6/13/1916, aged 78.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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William Donohue – [Plot D-50; Readable] ADOPTED

Donohue_William(SM).jpg

 

 

Died 5/01/1912, aged 72.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Thomas J. Donovan – [Plot F-02; No Marker] ADOPTED

Donovan_Thomas_J(sm)

 

Died 7/24/1879, aged 51.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

Thomas J. Donovan  (Confederate)

Enlistment:
- Enlisted as Private

Mustering information:
- Enlisted into A Company, 32nd Infantry (Tennessee)

Sources for the above information:
- Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records

 

69) http://alexanderstreet.com/resources/civilwar.access.htm

 

 

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Andrew_Dorsey

Pvt. Andrew Dorsey – [Plot J-03; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

Died 10/07/1906, aged 72.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Ord. Sgt. Charles Worthington Dorsey – [Plot B-55; Fairly Readable] ADOPTED

 

Charles_W_Dorsey

Born in Howard County, MD, and as a member of the Howard County Dragoons, a Maryland Militia company, crossed the Maryland border to Leesburg, VA, with about 75 members of the company.

 

1) Toomey, Page 47

 

Died 12/10/1908, aged 77.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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J_T_B_Dorsey

Captain J.T.B. Dorsey – [Plot C-97; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

Died 6/30/1898, aged 77.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

J.T.B. DORSEY, C-97, A. Q. M. CSA, died 30 June 1898 at age 77 years

 

US Civil War Soldiers 1861-1865

J.B.T. Dorsey

Confederate

Regiment: Confederate Troops

General and Staff Officers, Corps, Division and Brigade Staffs, Non-com. Staffs and Bands, Enlisted Men, Staff Departments, CSA

Rank in: Captain and A.Q.M.

Alternate name: John B. Dorsey

M818  roll 7

 

I’m not sure if the following is the correct person but I’ve including it, just in case.

 

American Civil War Soldiers

J. Dorsey

Confederate States

Enlisted as a Private

Quarter Master’s Department Regiment, Confederate States

 

American Civil War Soldiers

J. Dorsey

Confederate States

Enlisted as a Captain

Commission in General and Staff Regiment, Confederate States

 

American Civil War Soldiers

J. Dorsey

Confederate States

Enlisted as a Captain

Commission Co.A., Commissary Department Regiment, Confederate States

 

(The above information found on www.ancestry.com)

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

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Joseph_Dougherty

Pvt. Joseph Dougherty – [Plot E-48; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

Reburied 6/09/1874 from Virginia.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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John M. Downs – [Plot B-45; Barely Readable] ADOPTED

Downs_John_M_SM.jpg

 

Buried 11/02/1864.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Hamilton M. Dudley –[Plot J-15; Fairly Readable] ADOPTED

Dudley_Hamilton_M_SM.jpg

 

Died 7/13/1902, aged 57.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Sgt. James S. Durham – [Plot C-10; Readable] ADOPTED

Durham_James_S(SM)

 

Died 3/18/1925, aged 82.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Pvt. James T. Dutton – [Plot E-47; Unreadable] ADOPTED

Dutton_James_T(SM)

 

Reburied 6/09/1874 from Virginia.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Sgt. Thomas W. Dutton – [Plot C-100; Unreadable] ADOPTED

Dutton_Thomas_W(SM)

 

Died 9/29/1898, aged 68.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

The Sun Paper, 1 October 1898

DUTTON-On September 29 at the Confederate Home, Pikesville, THOMAS W. DUTTON, aged 63 years, second son of the late Col. John and Sarah Dutton of this city. Interment at Loudon Park.

 

The preceeding information from the Sun Paper was found on the website www.Genealogybank.com.

In small print “This entire and/or portions thereof are copyrighted by NewsBank and/or the American Antiquarian Society, 2004.”

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

 

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Frank M. DuVall – [Plot B-77a; No Marker] ADOPTED

 

Frank_M_DuVall

Died 6/26/1908, aged 69.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 FRANK M. DUVALL, Lot B-77a, no marker, Co. C., 2 MD Inf.

 

US Civil War Soldiers 1861-1865

Franklin DuVall

Confederate MD

2 Battn MD. Inf.., Co. C

Rank in/out: Private

 

There is a Frank M. Deval who served Maryland for the Confederacy in 2 Battn., MD., Cavalry. His rank in and out was Private. His alternate name was Frank M. DuVall.

 

American Civil War Soldiers

Franklin DuVall

Confederate MD

Enlisted as a Private, Co. C., 2 MD Inf. Reg.

Surrendered 9 April 1865 at Appomattox, VA

 

There is a Frank Duval, Confederate for Maryland, enlisted as a Private in 2 Battn. Cav. Reg. MD.

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

Franklin Duvall  (Confederate)

Enlistment:
- Enlisted as Private

Mustering information:
- Enlisted into C Company, 2nd Infantry (Maryland)
- Surrendered while serving in 2nd Infantry (Maryland) on Apr 9 1865 at Appomattox, VA

Sources for the above information:
- Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records
- Southern Historical Society Papers: Appomattox Paroles ANV

 

69) http://alexanderstreet.com/resources/civilwar.access.htm

 

 

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Dr. Phillip Barton DuVall – [Plot E-31; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

Dr_Phillip_Barton_DuVall

Reburied from Virginia, 1874.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 PHILIP BARTON DUVALL, Lot E-31, 1 MD Art.

 

US Civil War Soldiers 1861-1865

P.B. DuVall

Confederate  MD

1 Battery MD Art.

Rank in/out: Private

 

American Civil War Soldiers

P. DuVall

Confederate  MD

Enlisted as a Private

1st Light Artillery Reg. MD

 

I don’t know if this is the correct person but I’m including it, just in case.

American Genealogical-Biographical Index

Philip Barton DuVall

Born 1836 in Maryland

Physician, killed Indiana Civil War, unmarried

Ref: Colonial Fams. Of the Southern States of Amer. By Stella Pickett Hardy

 

63)  Courtesy Ms. Ms. Lisa Lockett.

 

 

 

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Luke J. Dyser – [Plot B-30; Readable] ADOPTED

Dyser_Luke_J_SM.jpg

 

 

Pvt., Co. G, 1st Md. Inf. b. York, Pa. 4/23/37. Res. of Baltimore. Enl. Harpers Ferry 5/23/61. Present 9-12/61. Ab. sick with debility in Richmond hospital 4/28/62. Transf. Danville hospital 5/5/62. Returned to duty 5/23/62. Discharged 3/9/63. 6', fair complexion, dark hair, hazel eyes, Blacksmith. However, had reenl. in Co. F, 41st Va. Inf. as substitute 7/15/62. Present through 12/31/64. NFR. Member, Army & Navy Society, Maryland Line Association and Arnold Elzey Camp, Confederate Veterans, Baltimore. Captain of Baltimore police 1905. Res. of Carroll, Baltimore Co. 1912. d. Baltimore 4/24/16. Bur. Loudon Park Cem.

 

23) Driver, Page 409

 

Died 4/24/1916, aged 79.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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