Pvt. Alexander Garden – [Plot C-85; Unreadable] ADOPTED

Garden_Alexander(SM)

 

Died 8/09/1909, aged 78.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

Enlisted 12 July, 1861, Charlotte, VA.  Disability discharge 17 July, 1862.  Height 5’-8”.  Eyes – Blue, Hair – Dark, Complexion – Light.

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

ALEXANDER GARDEN, C-85, Co. G, 56th VA Inf.

 

US Civil War Soldiers Records and Profiles

Alexander Garden

Occupation: Farmer

Enlisted: 7 Dec 1861 at Charlotte, Va. as a Private

Served: Virginia

Survived the War: YES

Enlisted in Co. G, VA 56th Inf. Reg 12 Dec 1861

Mustered out 17 July 1862

5’8”, blue eyes, dark hair, light complexion

The Virginia Regimental Histories Series

 

US Civil War Soldiers

Alexander Garden

Confederate VA

56th VA Inf, Co. G

Rank in/out: Private

M382 Roll 21

 

American Civil War Soldiers

Alexander Garden

Occupation: Farmer

Enlisted: 12 July 1861 in Charlotte, Va.

Confederate VA

Enlisted as a Private in Co. G, 56th VA Inf

Received a disability discharge 17 July 1862

5’8”, eyes blue, hair dark, complexion light

 

1850 US Federal Census-VA-Charlotte-Charlotte

 

Thomas J. Garden

54

Physician

Charlotte

Robina Garden

44

 

Campbell

John B. Garden

21

Physician

Charlotte

Thomas J Garden

19

 

Charlotte

Dandridge B. Garden

17

 

Charlotte

Alexander Garden

15

 

Charlotte

Granville Garden

13

 

Charlotte

Walter Garden

8

 

Charlotte

Robina Garden

6

 

Charlotte

Catherine Garden

75

 

Charlotte

 

 

 

 

1860 US Federal Census-VA-Charlotte

 

Robina Garden

58

 

Campbell

Dandridge B. Garden

28

Surgeon/dentist

Charlotte

Alex Garden

28

School master

Charlotte

Robina S. Garden

16

 

Charlotte

 

 

 

 

1870 US Federal Census-VA-Charlotte-Bacon

 

Garden, Robina

69

 

VA

Garden, Dandridge

39

Dentist

VA

Garden, Alexander

37

Farmer

VA

Garden, Robina

26

 

VA

Garden, Nannie

25

 

NC

 

Brother Dandridge B. Garden also served in Co. K, 18th VA Inf.  There are two other Gardens, Walter and Thomas James, who also served in Co. K., 18th VA Inf., possibly also brothers.

 

The (Baltimore) Sun, 11 August 1909-Mortuary Notice

ALEXANDER GARDEN

  Mr. Alexander Garden, a Confederate veteran, who died Sunday at the Confederate Soldiers’ Home, Pikesville, was buried in Loudon Park Cemetery yesterday.  He is survived by two daughters, both living in Atlanta, Ga.  Services were conducted in the Relic Hall at the home by Rev. Dr. Curley, of Pikesville.  The pallbearers were Messrs. H.E. Blanchard, George W. Bryant, F.T. Grove, D.M. Key, James McNulty and Charles Myers.

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

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E_B_Garden(sm)

E.B. Garden – [Plot A-01; Barely Readable] ADOPTED

 

Buried 12/23/1864.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Pvt. Hezekiah W. Gardner – [Plot B-03; Fairly Readable] ADOPTED

 

Died 04/24/1865, aged 21.  Buried November 1864.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Thomas J. Gardner – [Plot J-01; Unreadable] ADOPTED

Gardner_Thomas_J(SM)

 

Died 1/08/1906, aged 82.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

Thomas Gardener  (Confederate)

Biographical data and notes:
- Pre-enlistment occupation: Farmer
- Thomas Gardener died on Jan 8 1906
- He is buried at Loudoun Cemetery, Baltimore, MD

Enlistment:
- 39 years of age at time of enlistment
- Enlisted as Private

Mustering information:
- Enlisted into D Company, 35th Battn Cav (Virginia)
- Deserted from 35th Battn Cav (Virginia) on Jan 25 1864

Listed as:
- Oath Allegiance (date not indicated)

Sources for the above information:
- The Virginia Regimental Histories Series, (1987)

 

69) http://alexanderstreet.com/resources/civilwar.access.htm

 

THOMAS J. GARDNER

The (Baltimore) Sun, 9 January 1906

VETERAN DIED SUDDENLY

Thos. J. Gardner Expired Without Warning At Pikesville Home

   Mr. Thomas J. Gardner, a Confederate veteran, died at the home at Pikesville yesterday at 1:15 P.M.  His death was extremely sudden, he having given no indication of feeling  unwell and expiring without warning while sitting in the library.

   Mr. Gardner left the home last August to visit relatives in Montgomery county and in Washington, but returned last Tuesday.

   He was a member of Company D, of the Thirty-fifth Virginia Cavalry.  He enlisted in the spring of 1862 and was discharged in the fall of 1864 on account of disability.  He entered the home from Rockville, Montgomery county on December 4, 1901, and at the time of his death was 82 years old.

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

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Pvt. William B. Garrett – [Plot B-23; Readable] ADOPTED

 

Garrett, William B., Private, DOW 10/15/1864 Baltimore, MD, Buried Confederate Hill.

 

28) Courtesy Roxsanne Wells-Layton http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~york/18thSCV/D.html

 

Died 10/14/1864.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Pvt. Joseph A. Ross Gatch – [Plot F-07; Unreadable] ADOPTED

Gatch_Joseph_A_Ross(SM)

 

Died 3/28/1892, aged 63.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

The (Baltimore) Sun, 29 March 1892

GATCH- On March 28, JOSEPH A. R. GATCH, in the 63d year of his age, son of Mary Ann and the late Richard Gatch.

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

 

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Michael_Gavin

Michael Gavin – [Plot E-10; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

Died 4/18/1889, aged 56.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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E.B. Gentry – [Plot A-03; Fairly Readable] ADOPTED

 

Died 12/22/1864.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Albert_J_Gentry

Albert J. Gentry – [Plot B-93; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

Died 4/18/1907, aged 72.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

ALBERT J. GENTRY, B-93, AL Nelson Bty

 

US Civil War Soldiers Records and Profiles

Albert J. Gentry

Residence: Palmyra, VA

Occupation: Overseer

Enlisted: 8 June 1861 at Fluvanna Co. VA. as a Private

Served: Virginia

Enlisted in Co. 2nd VA Fluvanna #2 Light Artillery Battery on 6 August 1861. Mustered out on 4 October 1862. Transferred to the VA. Fluvanna Light Artillery on 4 Oct. 1862.

Died 18 April 1907

 

US Civil War Soldiers 1861-1865

Albert J. Gentry

Confederate VA

Capt. Snead’s Co. Va. Light Artillery (Fluvanna Artillery)

Rank in/out: Private

M382 Roll 22

 

American Civil War Soldiers

Albert Gentry

Residence: Palmyra, VA

Occupation: Overseer

Enlisted 6 Aug 1861 at Fluvanna Co., VA

Confederate VA

Died 18 April 1907

Enlisted as a Private 6 August 1861 in Co. 2nd, Fluvanna Artillery Reg. Va.  Transferred into Fluvanna Light Artillery Reg. VA. on 4 Oct. 1862.  Transferred out of Co. 2nd on 4 Oct. 1862.

 

1860 US Federal Census-VA-Fluvanna

 

 

 

 

 

Albert J. Gentry

20

Overseer

VA

 

 

 

Cordelia A. Gentry

26

 

VA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1880 US Federal Census-VA-Fluvanna-Palmyra-D 52

 

 

 

 

Gentry, Albert J.

42

Farmer

VA VA VA

 

 

 

Gentry, Cordelia

46

Wife

VA VA VA

 

 

 

Garrett, Mary A.

14

Niece

VA VA VA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1900 US Federal Census-MD-Balto. Independent City-W 24-D 314

 

 

 

Gentry, Charles

Aug 1865

34

M5yrs

VA VA VA

Painter

 

Gentry, Mary Ellen

Jan  1872

28  2-2 M5yrs

 

MD ? VA

Wife

 

Gentry, Clayton

Aug 1896

3

 

MD VA VA

Son

 

Gentry, Ida C.

Sep 1897

2

 

MD VA MD

Daughter

 

Gentry, Albert

Jan 1843

57

Wd

VA VA VA

Father

Laborer

 

The (Baltimore) Sun, 22 April 1907-Mortuary Notice

ALBERT J. GENTRY

   The funeral for Mr. Albert J. Gentry, who died at the Confederate Soldiers’ Home, Pikesville, took place yesterday. Rev. G. McL Brydon conducted the service and Memorial Branch of St. Cecelia guild sang.

   Mr. Gentry was a member of Nelson’s Battalion, Virginia Light Artillery, and served from August/1861 to the surrender of Lee’s army at Appomattox.

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

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Pvt. Solomon Arthur Gephart – [Plot H-12; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

Solomon_A_Gephart

Pvt., Co. A, 1st Md. lnf. b. Cumberland, Md. circa 1821. Moved to Frederick, Md. as a child. Ent. Harpers Ferry 5/21/61. Present 7-9/61. Present on extra duty 11-12/61. Discharged 5/21/62. Reenl. Co. A, 1st Md. Cav. 7/5/62. Discharged by 12/31/64. Paroled New Market, Va. 4/19/65. Age 40, 5'9 1/2", light complexion, dark hair, brown eyes. Took oath Harpers Ferry 4/22/65. Member, Army & Navy Society, Maryland Line Association. Entered Old Soldiers' Home, Pikesville, Md. from Frederick, Md. 6/19/88 age 67, Shoemaker. d. there 3/14/04 age 81. Bur. Loudon Park Cem., Baltimore.

 

23) Driver, Page 419

 

Born in Cumberland, MD. Enlisted in Frederick City, MD, April 20, 1861, as a private in Company A, First Maryland Infantry.

 

1) Toomey, Page 53

 

Died 3/14/1904, aged 83.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Gibbins

Gibbins – [Plot A-45; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

Died and buried 12/30/1863.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Beverly_Gibson

Beverly Gibson – [Plot F-03; Barely Readable] ADOPTED

 

Died 1/12/1880, aged 51.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

BEVERLY GIBSON, F-03, C.S. Navy, died 12 January 1880 at age 51 years

 

American Civil War Soldiers

Beverly Gibson

Residence: Kentucky

Enlisted: 19 September 1864

Confederate

Enlisted as a Acting Master’s Mate

Commission in Navy Regiment, Confederate States 19 September 1864

Promoted to Full Acting Midshipman 17 December 1864

 

(Source: www.ancestry.com)

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

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Fayette Gibson* – [Plot H-15; Unreadable] ADOPTED

Gibson_Fayette(SM)

 

Died 12/28/1903, aged 73.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

* Fayette Gibson’s name appears on the famous “Maryland Scroll” that can be found on display in the visitor’s center at Brandy Station Battlefield. The building is otherwise known as “Graffiti House” owing to the massive amount of Civil War era writings and drawings to be found on the walls within the structure. Please make an effort to visit this site. It is a national treasure.

 

Fayette Gibson  (Confederate)

Enlistment:
- Enlisted as Corporal

Mustering information:
- Enlisted into C Company, Stuart Horse 1st LA (Virginia)

Sources for the above information:
- Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records

 

69) http://alexanderstreet.com/resources/civilwar.access.htm

 

FAYETTE GIBSON, H-15, VA Breathed’s Bty

 

US Civil War Soldiers Records and Profiles

Fayette Gibson

Residence: Talbot Co., Md.

Enlisted 7 Dec 1862 at Richmond, Va. as a Corporal

Served: Virginia

Enlisted in Co. 1st VA, 1st Co. Stuart Horse Light Artillery Bty, 12 July 1862

Mustered out 15 Sept. 1864

Died 28 Dec 1903

The Virginia Regimental Histories Series

 

American Civil War Soldiers

Fayette Gibson

Residence: Talbot Co., Md.

Enlisted 12 July 1862 at Richmond, Va.

Confederate VA

Died 28 Dec 1903

Enlisted as a Corporal in co. 1st, 1st Stuart Horse Light Artillery Reg. Va.

Transferred out 15 Set. 1864

 

1850 US Federal Census-MD-Talbot-St. Michaels

 

 

John Chew Gibson

23

Physician

MD

 

Rebecca R. Gibson

25

 

MD

 

Mary Gibson

20

 

MD

 

Fayette Gibson

18

 

MD

 

Edward Gibson

16

 

MD

 

Priscilla Gibson

12

 

MD

 

William Gibson

10

 

MD

 

 

 

 

 

 

1880 US Federal Census-Montana-Jefferson-Boulder Valley-D 17

 

Gibson, Fayette

47

Miner

MD MD MD

 

Gibson, Edward

45

Miner

MD MD MD

 

Gibson, William

39

Miner

MD MD MD

 

 

 

 

 

 

1900 US Federal Census-MD-Harford-Have de Grace- D 155

 

Gibson, Mary

May 1835

65

MD MD MD

School teacher

Gibson, Rebecca

Sep 1830

69

MD MD MD

Sister

Gibson, Fayette

Nov 1837

62

MD MD MD

Brother

Gibson, Elizabeth

Nov 1840

59

MD MD MD

 

 

I found his obituary on www.genealogybanck.com (The [Baltimore] Sun, 29 Dec 1903) but it is a very bad copy and parts are hard to read. Some parts I can make out are:

His mother was the oldest daughter of Col John H. Chew of Calvert Co.

Fayette had been an invalid for many years and lived with his sister Mary, Rebecca and Elizabeth.  His brothers, Edward and William, also served for the Army of Northern Virginia.  Fayette, Edward and William went to Montana to engage in ranching.

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

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Henry_T_Gibson

Henry T. Gibson – [Plot A-40; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

Died 8/19/1863.  Buried 8/20/1863, aged 27.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

The information I have is Henry T. Gibson b. Feb 15th, 1837 in Albamarle Co, Va and Died Aug 19th, 1863, following the Battle of Gettysburg. This information was found in the family bible. I have also learned through civil war records that he was assigned to Co H, 56th Virginia, Hunton's Brigade.

 

21) Courtesy of Brad Gibson.

 

Henry T. Gibson  (Confederate)
- Henry T. Gibson is buried at Loudoun Park Cemetery, Baltimore, MD
- Death claim filed Nov 14, 1863 for $175.43.

Enlistment:
- Residing in Albemarle County, VA at time of enlistment
- Enlisted as Private

Mustering information:
- Died of wounds while serving in 56th Infantry (Virginia)
- Enlisted into H Company, 56th Infantry (Virginia)

Listed as:
- Hospitalized on Jun 24 1862 at Chimborazo Hospl, Richmond, VA (With catarrh)
- Returned on Aug 10 1862
- POW on Jul 2 1863 at Gettysburg, PA
- Wounded on Jul 3 1863 at Gettysburg, PA
- Confined on Jul 25 1863 at West Building Hospital, Baltimore, MD (With gunshot wound of humerous)

Sources for the above information:
- The Virginia Regimental Histories Series, (1987)

 

69) http://alexanderstreet.com/resources/civilwar.access.htm

 

 

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Pvt. Robert W. Gibson – [Plot A-51; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

Robert_W_Gibson

Pvt Robert W. Gibson, Co. L, 21st SC, from Marion District, died of wounds on 10/17/64. age 23, at Baltimore, MD and is buried in Loudon Park Cemetery.

58)  Courtesy of Jim Gabel JAGabel@aol.com

 

Died 10/17/1864

 

62)  Confederate P.O.W.'S, Soldiers and Sailors Who Died in Federal Prisons and Military Hospitals In The North , Francis Ingmire and Carolyn Ericson editors, Published by the National Archives, 1984 from an original dated 1912 called Register of Confederate Soldiers and Sailors who died in Federal Prisons and Military Hospitals in the North, Compiled in the Office of the Commissioner for Marking Graves of the Confederate Dead, War Department, 1912

 

Buried 10/17/1864.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Lt. Col Harry W. Gilmor – [Plot F-04a; Readable] UNAVAILABLE (Private Marker)

 

Harry Gilmor was born January 24, 1838 at "Glen Ellen," the family estate in Baltimore County, Maryland.  After homesteading in Wisconsin and Nebraska, he returned to Maryland in time to join the newly formed Baltimore County Horse Guards as a corporal.  After the efforts of the citizens of Baltimore to prevent the movement of Federal troops through the city, the Horse Guards received orders to burn several bridges north of the city to prevent further troop movements toward Washington City.  Following the occupation of Baltimore by Federal troops under Brigadier General Benjamin "Beast" Butler, Gilmor was one of many to be arrested and imprisoned in Fort McHenry.  After his release, he traveled South and joined the command of Colonel Turner Ashby on August 31, 1861.  In March 1862, he was commissioned Captain of Company F, Twelfth Virginia Cavalry.  Captain Gilmor served throughout the Valley Campaign.  At times, he was on special assignment to General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson.  He was arrested during the Sharpsburg Campaign, while in the Baltimore area visiting family.  He spent five months in prison.  He participated in the Battle of Brandy Station and was sighted in the after action reports of General Fitzhugh Lee and General J.E.B. Stuart for his conduct in this engagement.  On May 27, 1863, he was promoted to the rank of Major and asked to raise an independent battalion of cavalry.  Before he could complete this assignment, the Gettysburg campaign interceded.  During the battle, Major Gilmor was assigned command of the First and Second Maryland Cavalry, under General George Steuart's infantry brigade.  Major Gilmor was the Provost Marshal of the town of Gettysburg while it was occupied.  Gilmor had organized six companies of partisan rangers by September of 1863.  His command's area of operation was the Shenandoah Valley and parts of "West" Virginia.  General J.E.B. Stuart ordered Gilmor to attack the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad in February of 1864.  After the defeat of Major General Lew Wallace at Monocacy on July 9, 1864, Gilmor's command acted as the spearhead for the raid around Baltimore in 1864 with General Bradley T. Johnson's infantry command.  While assigned to scout duty under General Jubal Early, Colonel Gilmor single-handedly captured a company of Federal infantry.  Gilmor and Holmes Conrad, a man under his command, later captured more than 50 troopers from the First New Jersey Cavalry.  Colonel Gilmor was ordered by General Early to take his command to Hardy County, West Virginia.  He was to combine with other partisans in the area and attack the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad.  Colonel Gilmor was finally captured in Hardy County, on February 4, 1865.  He remained a prisoner at Fort Warren until July 24, 1865.  For several years after the war, Harry Gilmor lived in New Orleans, where he married Miss Mentoria Strong.  Upon his return to Maryland, he was elected colonel of cavalry in the Maryland National Guard.  He also served as Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1874 to 1879.  He was a member of the Society of the Army and Navy of the Confederate States in Maryland and it's Vice-President in 1882.  Harry Gilmor died in Baltimore on March 4, 1883 at the age of forty-five.  He was interred on "Confederate Hill" in Loudon Park Cemetery.  To this day, people gather at his graveside on the anniversary of his birth to honor his life long service to his country.

 

8) http://www.mdscv.org/1388/bio.htm

 

Died 3/04/1883, aged 45.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

Harry W. Gilmor  (Confederate)

Enlistment:
- Enlisted as Major

Mustering information:
- Commissioned into Field and Staff, 2nd Battn Cav (Maryland)

Promotions:
- Promoted to Lt Col (Full, Vol) (date not indicated)

Sources for the above information:
- Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records
- Field Officers, Regiments & Battalions of CS Army

 

69) http://alexanderstreet.com/resources/civilwar.access.htm

 

 

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Pvt. Hoffman Gilmor – [Plot F-03a; Readable] UNAVAILABLE (Private Burial)

 

Died 12/21/1912, aged 68.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

H. Gilmor  (Confederate)

Enlistment:
- Enlisted as Private

Mustering information:
- Enlisted into F Company, 2nd Battn Cav (Maryland)

Sources for the above information:
- Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records

 

69) http://alexanderstreet.com/resources/civilwar.access.htm

 

 

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Mentoria Nixon Gilmor – [F-04b; Readable] UNAVAILABLE (Private Burial)

 

Born around 1834 in New Orleans, LA.. Wife of Lt. Col. Harry W. Gilmor.

 

9) Rootsweb (http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=ourfamily2003&id=I76874)

 

Died 12/13/1879.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Capt. Richard Tilghman Gilmor – [Plot F-05a; Readable] UNAVAILABLE (Private Burial)

 

2nd Lt., Co. H (2nd), 1st Md. Inf. b. Glen Ellen, Baltimore Co., Md. 8/14/40. Res. of Towson, Baltimore Co. Arrested during Baltimore riot 4/19/61 and held for $13,000 bail. Released and ordered to go south, but stopped at Ft. Monroe and confined aboard U. S. S. Cumberland. Released and ordered to Baltimore. Went to Richmond instead. Enl. Richmond 6/18/61. Elected 2nd Lt., Co. H, 1st Md. Inf. 6/61. Present Camp Johnston near Winchester 6/61. Present 9/12/61. Paid 1/5/62, 2/20/62 and 7/22/62. Company disbanded 8/17/62. WIA (leg) Frederick, Md. 7/63. Reenl. Co. F, 12th Va. Cav. 10/31/63 as Pvt. Promoted 2nd Lt., 1st Lt. and Captain, Co. C, 2nd Md. Cav. WIA (left side) Middletown 10/64. Paroled Campbell C.H. 5/27/65. Returned to Baltimore 8/9/65. Served as Bailiff in Baltimore Criminal Court. Member, Army & Navy Society, Maryland Line Association. Entered Old Soldiers' Home, Pikesville, Md. 1892. d. 8/23/08. Bur. Loudon Park Cem., Baltimore.

 

23) Driver, Page 420

 

The brother of Lt. Col. Harry W. Gilmor.

 

10) Rootsweb (http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=traci_church&id=I0650)

 

Died 8/23/1908.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

Richard Tilghman Gillmore  (Confederate)

Biographical data and notes:
- Born in Glen Ellen, Baltimore Co., MD
- Last known address: Towson, MD
-
Richard Tilghman Gillmore died on Aug 23 1908 at Confederate Soldiers Home, Pikesville, MD
-
He is buried at Loudoun Park Cemetery, Baltimore, MD
-
Father: Robert Gilmor (sic). Brother: Major Harry & 2nd Lt Meredith Gilmor (sic)

Enlistment:
- Residing in Baltimore, MD at time of enlistment
- Enlisted on Jun 18 1861 at Richmond, VA as Second Lieutenant

Mustering information:
- Transferred from 7th Cavalry (Virginia) (Only on post war rosters)
- Discharged from 1st Infantry (Maryland)
- Commissioned into H Company, 1st Infantry (Maryland) on Jun 18 1861
- Enlisted into A Company, 7th Cavalry (Virginia) on Feb 15 1862
- Commissioned into C Company, 2nd Battn Cav (Maryland) on Oct 12 1863

Promotions:
- Promoted to Capt (Full, Vol) (date not indicated) (Promoted to Captain with 2nd MD Cavalry)

Listed as:
- Hospitalized on Jul 1 1863 at Lynchburg, VA (Sick, estimate date)
- AWOL on Sep 18 1863 at Madison County, VA
- Furloughed on Oct 8 1863 at Richmond, VA
- Oath Allegiance on May 27 1865 at Campbell Court House, VA

Sources for the above information:
- The Virginia Regimental Histories Series, (1987)
- Maryland's Blue & Gray, (LSU Press, 1997)

 

69) http://alexanderstreet.com/resources/civilwar.access.htm

 

 

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Pvt. John Gilpin – [Plot C-17; Barely Readable] ADOPTED

Gilpin_John(SM)

 

Buried 10/14/1864.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

PVT. JOHN GILPIN, CO. F 22 VA. CAVALRY

BOWEN'S REGIMENT of MOUNTED RIFLEMEN


*Introduction*

John Gilpin (first husband of Mary Frances Karnes) was born about 1823, parents are as yet unknown. The earliest written information on John Gilpin (husband of Mary Karnes) is on the 1850 Virginia federal census, with John living in the household of Adam Hedrick, a blacksmith, along with others with various skills, in Tazewell Co. Virginia. Why John was living in this household, I also do not know. It was a common practice to send a son as young as 14 years old to live and work as an apprentice with a professional. After so many years were served, the son could then consider himself as educated in this matter and begin his own business, if he so chose. This may or may not have been the case with John. He became a farmer. Perhaps he moved to Tazewell and just needed a place to stay.

I am searching for information to determine if James Gilpin of Smyth County, Virginia, may have been the father of John Gilpin who married Mary Frances Karnes. James Gilpin and Rodham Gilpin were both married in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, l809 and l803. Rodham was born about l785 and James about l780. James was first in Washington Co Va, and later in Smyth Co Va, probably due to a county boundary line change.

Another possibility of a father for John Gilpin (married to Mary Frances Karnes) was a John Gilpin in Bedford County, Virginia in l820. According to information from the l820 census, this John was born about l775 to l794, the woman of this house was born in this same time period. There were four children from infant to twenty five years of age. I believe this John is the same one that also lived in Washington County, Virginia, the same county James lived in prior to Smyth County. Because James was born about l780 and Rodham about l803, perhaps James, Rodham and this John may have been brothers or cousins.?.? James had five children from infant to sixteen years of age in 1820. The elder John Gilpin may have been connected to the Bedford Co Va Gilpins.

*******

John Gilpin (b: al823) married Mary Frances Karnes between 1852 and 1853. John may have been about twenty seven years old and Mary about seventeen or so.

"Virginia Mounted Riflemen"

In July 1863 Federal Brigadier General John Toland, over the West Virginia and Ohio cavalry, invaded Tazewell County, Virginia. He came up the Tug River Valley and entered Abb's Valley on July 15, 1863, crossing Stony Ridge in Tazewell County and camped 1/2 mile from Col. Henry S. Bowen's home. On the 16th they burned Lain's Mill and some homes. They were near Jeffersonville (the county seat, now called Tazewell) and captured fifteen or twenty civilian men. Some Kentuckians who were camped on Bowen's farm pursued them. On the 17th Toland reached Wythville and, after running off the defenders of the town, began to destroy the railroad line. These Yankees were scared off by an approaching train which they thought contained confederate troops. This saved Wythville.

 

Many of the companies in the 22nd Virginia Cavalry were formed within weeks after this incident. Many of these men may have served in the local militia, or home guard. In September of l862, an amendment to the Conscription Act had raised the eligible age limit to 45. John was about 39. The previous age limit was 35. For a reason unknown presently, John did not join the service at the beginning of the war. Whether he didn't believe in fighting or just didn't believe in this war, he held out for a couple of years before joining up. 22nd

 

OFF TO WAR

 

John Gilpin, at the age of about forty, either enlisted or was conscripted into the 22nd Virginia Cavalry on August 8, 1863 for a term of three years. This was also the date the 22nd Virginia Cavalry was organized, though they weren't officially recognized until October 27, 1863. John was signed in by Captain Brown at Lynchburg, Virginia. (Military service records, National Archives)

 

According to Dick Gilpin of Princeton, Mercer Co., West Virginia, Mary did not know John was leaving, and apparently when she found out, she sent someone down to the train station to get the horse. I don't know if he bought another horse or what, but from what I have read, he had to supply his own horse to be in the cavalry. This incident leaves many suppositions open to the mind. Did Mary consider the horse to be more important than her husband? Was the horse the only horse they had, and needed for plowing? Was John sneaking off, and Mary decided he could go but the horse stayed? Or perhaps it was Mary's way of protesting John going off to the war. Because John enlisted on the day the 22nd was organized, it must have been a spur of the moment thing. Possibly those not yet fighting actively in the war were being coerced into going to fight, and John couldn't ignore the situation any more, and simultaneously couldn't face Mary with the news that he was joining.

 

The 22nd Virginia Cavalry was organized by Col. Henry S. Bowen, formerly of the 188th Militia (Tazewell), under the authority of Brigadier General John Stuart Williams. This unit was not an ordinary cavalry unit. Because so many men wanted to be in the cavalry it had been ordered that no more cavalry units were to be formed. They needed "foot soldiers", but at this point in the war, things were not going well for the South. Because of this, it was allowed that the 22nd Virginia Cavalry would be formed to act as partisan rangers. They would, in effect, be primarily in existence to scout, harass and raid the north and would use "guerilla" tactics to carry out their goals. Their horses would have allowed for greater mobility, though many times they would have dismounted and fought as dragoons, as the need arose. 22nd Virginia Cavalry, p 14, 15.

 

22nd Virginia Cavalry, Bowen's Mounted Riflemen

 

As depicted in 22nd and other references; Capt. William W. Brown 1st Lt. Jess Barker; 2nd Lt. Granville H. Neel 2nd Lt. John T. Litz; 2nd Lt. Thomas Turley.

 

Pvt. David Lumpkin Eubanks of Co. K wrote after the war that in 1863 "[w]e operated on the line between Virginia and Tennessee, and on the neck between North Carolina and Tennessee. We made one raid down into Kentucky and brought out a lot of horses and cattle." 22nd p21.

 

October 1, 1863 - Maj. General Robert Ransom assumed command. 22nd

October 20, 1863 - Back in Tazewell Co Va., John Gilpin's young son, Charles, turned five years old. The harvest season would have been about over now. The summer, in all its glory, was fading into fall. John prepared for roll call on this day. It hadn't been quite two months yet since he had joined.

 

December 4, 1863 The 22nd Virginia cavalry was stationed at the "camp of instruction" at Dublin, Pulaski Co., Virginia on December 3l, l863, per return of Major General Samuel Jones, Commander, headquarters, Dublin Depot, Virginia. They didn't appear to have been impressed with the "silly drill and ceremony." This needs to be checked further as on a later date, December 5, 1863, Tommie Morris of Co. G wrote "We are in camp ten miles west of Jeffersonville, will start tomorrow morning to the Ridgement to draw cloths. The Ridgement is at Tazewell County at Liberty Hill. They are going to Russell Co. to winter. They say we will come to Wythe Co. to winter. I have got me a fine horse. We have plenty to eat and nothing to do." The 22nd was "unattached" but listed under Jenkins cavalry brigade. 22nd p20.

 

December 31, 1863

 

Army of Western Virginia and Eastern Tennessee, Major General Samuel Jones, C.S.A., Commander, Headquarters, Dublin Depot, Virginia, included Ransom's Division, Echols Brigade, McCausland's Brigade, Jenkins Brigade, cavalry, 22nd Virginia cavalry, unattached, (total 788, present 539), Botetourt Artillery, unattached, and Hart's Company, engineer troops. (Official Records, Series I, Vol 29, p.908 for above. Series I Vol 3l, p.892 has 22nd under Jenkins' cavalry brigade, though noted as unattached.)

John was present for roll call on this day and was paid by Captain Stuart. Was this Christmas season spent with the company of family? From December 31, 1863 to August 31, 1864 the 22nd was officially stationed in Milford, Virginia. (Military Rec's)

Being away from the family and farm must have been both difficult and a dangerous adventure for John. He was a farmer and was surely reminded as such when the harsh reality of war took the place of Mary and the children. Agnes would have been old enough to help with the Christmas dinner that year. The baby, Mary, would have been old enough to enjoy Christmas. (Would John have sent them some money. Could the mail system have been dependable at this time?)

 

Campaign of 1864

 

(Unless otherwise indicated, much of the information in this following section for April and May was taken from Unreconstructed Rebel: The Life of General John McCausland, C.S.A., by Michael J. Pauley and Official Records, Series 1, Vol 37)

 

April 30, 1864 - 22nd was assigned to Albert Gallatin Jenkins cavalry brigade, and under the command of Major General John C. Breckinridge. They had no artillery support units. Breckenridge reported directly to General Robert E. Lee. Official Rec's. Jenkins' Cav. Brigade included: 14 Va , Col. Cochran; 16 Va., Maj. Nounnan 17 Va., Col French; 22 Va., Col. Henry S. Bowen

 

May 2, 1864: Breckenridge at Dublin, Original Rec's (O.R.) p.708; "The bread question still keeps me like a horse on a tread-mill. ... Try to ascertain privately the prospects of subsistence and forage in front in case we contemplate a movement on Baltimore and Ohio Railroad or to Kanawha ..." Lee had informed Breckenridge the day prior that no reinforcements could be sent.

 

May 5 - 8, 1864: Breckenridge rode for three days on horseback for l45 miles to Staunton to meet Sigel, while Crook moved in on Dublin - Br. Gen. Albert Jenkins and Col. McCausland were to intercept Crook - on the 9th Crook sent troops out to flank the Rebels. One brigade of Crook's was led by Col. Rutherford B. Hays, later a President of the United States of America. This encounter led to a fierce hand-to-hand combat for two hours at Dublin, where Jenkins was killed. (Season)

 

Battle of Cloyd's Mountain, Pulaski County, Virginia, About five miles from Dublin.

May 9: McCausland reported that Jenkins had been wounded and carried from the field. At that point, the lines were broken and McCausland felt that the day was lost. He rallied as many men as he could and using the fragmented regiments, formed them into a rear guard. (War, Series I, Vol 37, p.45)

 

McCausland: " The enemy charged repeatedly with cavalry but were repulsed with considerable loss. As I approached Dublin I met with Co. D. H. Smith with 500 dismounted men of General Morgan's command, that had just reached the depot from Saltville, and were then moving out to the field. I placed them in position to cover the retreat, and moved the remaining troops through Dublin to the New River bridge." (War)

William H. French, temporary commander of Jenkins Brigade, requested that the 22nd and 16th cavalry be sent to Monroe County. Lewisburg in Greenbrier County, West Virginia, was under Federal occupation. In McCausland's correspondence, he stated, "I assumed command, being the senior officer, and collected the troops at [New River Bridge]. The enemy ... may drive me away tomorrow. Our loss is heavy in killed and wounded. (War, Series I, Vol. 37, p44)

 

McCausland Synopsis, War, Series I, Vol 37, p.45:

" The position on the west side of the river was entirely untenable, and an attempt to hold it would have resulted in the discomfiture and capture of my command. ... Our [artillery] ammunition became exhausted, many horses were killed ... when I gave the order to withdraw. The troops retired in good order, passed through Christiansburg, and moved east to Big Hill, seven miles west of Salem, where they were posted to meet the enemy... We reached Big Hill the llth and remained there the 12th." McCausland ordered a withdrawal of the guns with the infantry following and burned the bridge behind them. Two were killed and six wounded. They headed towards Christiansburg. (Military Operations p56)

 

Pvt. Eubank's letter (U.S.A.) regarding this situation: "We charged the Yankees at Jackson's River and they fled before us. In crossing [the] river at Dublin several men were drowned, and 75 horses riderless swam back to us. We followed the enemy to Covington and passed around the valley through the Elk Gardens and viewed the beautiful scenery." (22nd, p.20)

 

Comment by General Johnson:

"I had about 800 half-armed and badly disciplined mountaineer from southwest Virginia, who would fight like veterans when they pleased, but had no idea of permitting their own sweet wills to be controlled by any orders, no matter from whom emanating. They were as brave and as fearless and as undisciplined as the Highlanders who followed Charles Edward of Culloden." (22nd, p.25)

"Col. H. S. Bowen, Twenty-second Virginia Regiment, arrived here ... with his regiment and a part of the Sixteenth Regiment (Jenkins Brigade), under orders from General W. E. Jones to picket and guard the front line and the line of this department to Pound Gap. The Twenty-second Regiment was attached to this brigade by order of General Breckenridge, and was ordered to report to Brigadier-General Jenkins. I desire to know whether General Jones or yourself is in command of this department. If he is not, I respectfully ask that you take the necessary steps to have the Twenty-second Regiment returned to this command. ... General Jones ordered Colonel Bowen to report to me at this place, accompanied with the additional orders above." William H. French, Narrows (War, Series I, Vol 37, p63)

 

May 17, 1864 - William L. Jackson, letter to McCausland, 10:30 a.m.: "Having received reliable information that the whole force of the enemy is moving toward Lewisburg ... I have ordered my mounted men to follow in their rear ... with a view to annoy the crossing (via burnt bridge) ... my command, now terribly in need of shoes, clothes, ... are on half rations ... The enemy ... have suffered terribly. The whole road is strewn with dead horses ... My command has captured a number of prisoners... (War, Vol 37, p740) Jackson was at Jackson River Depot and Sweet Springs area on this date.

 

The Union troops took what food they could from the inhabitants in Monroe County and around Alderson, leaving the inhabitants destitute.

 

Pvt. Newton to his wife on June 1, 1864 from Camp Union:

I have not heard from home since I past through the garden ... and it is said that thear is sum yankees thear [Lewisburg] and we expect a fight, but we do not know when. (22nd, p24)

Pvt. Eubanks of Co. K wrote:

We had a fight at Staunton and ... Middlebrook ... we skirmished at Brownsburg and fell back to Lexington. I stood by the corner of the Institute at the latter place and fought, while bricks from the structure fell around me.

During a slight engagement at Buckannon we placed a wire across the road ... the Yankee troops, not seeing it for the smoke and dust. Then our artillery would [fire] a few canister and shot from one of our batteries.

Orders were given to fire the bridges when our troops had passed over. Some hasty fellows fired it too soon and left an officer and myself on the enemy's side... [W]e happened to find a skiff, hastened to the other side, and ran down the river under heavy fire in view of both armies. We then crossed the mountain en route to Lynchburg... (22nd, p26)

(See page 82/83/84/85 in Season for an accounting of Lexington)

McCausland burned the wooden covered bridge on the North River, slowing Hunter down for only one day. The Federal artillery bombarded the buildings of Virginia Military Institute (VMI). McCausland finally withdrew. The Federals entered Lexington and Hunter had the VMI campus destroyed, including the library collection which some scholars of that day said was among the five best in the world, which inventory included originals from John James Audubon. (Unreconstructed) Perhaps not all was lost, as the USA troops looted the campus, taking instruments, books, and much more.

 

One June 17, 1864 the 22nd Virginia Confederate cavalry lost one man KIA at Forrest Depot prior to the battle at Lynchburg, Edward J. Culbertson of Co. A. There were numerous bloody skirmishes on this day. (22nd p27) At this point the Confederates were outnumbered two to one.

 

Lt. Jubal "Old Jube" Early was ordered by General Lee to take over Confederate operations in the Shenandoah Valley. (See page 86 in Season for a personal description). Though Early felt Hunter would be impossible to stop, Lynchburg was a crucial war industrial and rail center and considered critical to the Confederate effort. (22nd p27)

 

Battle of Lynchburg: The night before a train had scurried up and down the tracks as if it brought in reinforcements to Lynchburg and bugles and drum rolls could be heard by even Hunters men. It was a ploy that even the townspeople took part in, with bands playing and citizens screaming. Hunter became convinced Lee had sent an army in. On the turnpike outside the city near the old Quaker church, McCausland was at the right flank, somewhere between the river and creek. Crook was going to attack McCausland's men but decided it unwise. The day grew hot and the soldiers suffered from exhaustion, fear, heat and dust. The constant noise of the artillery filled the air on and off throughout the day. The battle ended sometime after 2:00 p.m.

 

The course of these events turned to favor the Confederates and now the Federals fled. That morning Major Genera. R. Ransom joined McCausland's brigade as they sped to Buchanan in an effort to cut off Hunter. The day became hot and the roads thick with dust. Kyd Douglas noted, as they went, "ransacked houses, crying women, clothes ... draggled in the road, the garments of little children, here and there ... a burning house marked ... Hunter's retreat ... and ... I felt that vengeance ought not be left entirely to the Lord." (Season, pl05) McCausland hoped to take General David Hunter prisoner, and on the 19th caught up with Hunter's rear guard at Liberty (now Bedford, Va) ten miles west of Lynchburg. McCausland then captured part of Hunter's supply train, destroying part of it and then resumed the chase.

 

Lynchburg Campaign comes to an end

 

June 21, 1864 - The Confederate's lost one man as prisoner on June 21st, William P. Daugherty of Co. A (who later died of pneumonia) in Salem, Virginia. (22nd) The Federals were followed by Ransom to Sweet Springs Mountain. They suffered through heat, dust, rain, mud and hours in the saddle. McCausland caught up with the Federals and taking prisoners, several pieces of artillery, several hundred fresh horses and a large amount of stores, such as ammunition, clothing and personal property which the Federals had taken in their plundering. The prisoners were sent to General Early and McCausland continued to pursue Hunter, who escaped in the Kanawha Valley. The chase was then abandoned. Hunter retreated, moving day and night, to Catawba Mountain, New Castle, Barbour, Warm Springs Mountain, Sweet Springs, White Sulphur Springs (was at WSS on the 24th), Lewisburg on the 26th, Gauley, Kanawha County at Charleston on the 30th. (Season)

 

By June 26th Early's army of 14,00 entered Staunton, Virginia in the Shenandoah Valley and moved northward. Early was sent north by Lee with 10,000 men to run Union troops out of the Shenandoah Valley, to take tributes from Pennsylvania towns and to harass Washington, DC. (The Civil War) (check 36Va by Scott Between 6/21 and 6/26, 1864)

McCausland, under Major General Robert Ransom, rejoined the main army just outside Lexington. Many of Early's men had served under Stonewall Jackson and as they passed the cemetery where Stonewall's grave was located, General Robert Rodes requested the band play a derge. The columns silently passed with hats reversed and arms reversed. Douglas Southall

 

General Lee, with Hunter moving westward, decided to move toward D.C. Sigel had become a joke to all as a military leader and the CSA held no fear of him or of Max Weber. Lee wrote a letter to Jefferson Davis and the plans began. Early now commanded, Breckenridge was second in command. Early blamed Imboden and McCausland for Hunter's escape, and the cavalry felt little for Early. (__________________)

 

July 28, 1864 - The main body of the Confederate army passed northward through Lexington and arrived in Staunton. McCausland was in the lead as the army left Staunton on this date and passed New Market on the 30th. The paved roads were hard on the unshod feet of some of the soldiers. Shoes were requested. Early's newly formed Army of the Valley advanced on Washington, D.C. with l4,000 infantry, 4,000 cavalry, 50 cannons, l000 gunners, l0 guns with the cavalry. (__________________)

 

July 5, 1864 - McCausland's Brigade then moved on toward the Potomac River, camping in Jefferson County at Shepardstown. McCausland's cavalry took the Sharpsburg turnpike, having failed to rendezvous with Bradley Johnson at Hainsville. McCausland's orders were to follow Sigel across the Potomac, and then continue on to Hagerstown to burn it or collect $200,000.00 ransom. McCausland crossed the Potomac River on the 4th, burning some canal barges at Slack Water. The smoke proved to be an alarm to those guarding Hagerstown and they evacuated the military supplies. McCausland reached Hagerstown on the 5th. About a mile east of Shepherdstown was a ford and bridge. Since the bridge had been burned in l861 by rebel troops, the ford crossing was the only way. The foot soldiers without shoes were tortured from the assortment of shells stuck to the river bottom, which cut and tore the flesh from the feet of the men as they made their way across. (Season) They were ordered to prepare three days rations, meaning a battle was imminent. They would have passed through Haysville and then on to Washington. (22nd p31) General Lee's plan was to attack Washington to redirect the Federal forces away from Richmond and possibly capture the city, President Lincoln and perhaps liberate confederate prisoners held at Point Lookout.

 

July 5, 1864 - McCausland's Brigade reached town on the 5th, driving the USA pickets in towards town, where a skirmish occurred. McCausland and the US troops both retreated from town. July 6, 1864 - Early's headquarters were officially moved across the Potomac, to Sharpsburg. Early's aide, Henry Kyd Douglas, stated: "... it is safe to say no other General ... would have attempted it against such odds." (Season)

McCausland's men moved into Hagerstown uncontested in the morning. A contribution of $20,000" (instead of the intended $200,000.00) was levied from the inhabitants to save the town from destruction. (Season) This was a clerical error. Clothing was also received, having requested 1500 civilian clothing. As it came in the form of suits, it was unsuitable for the soldiers. If they were to be caught in civilian clothes by the enemy, the could be shot as a spy. Many were barefoot and on July 7th obtained shoes. (22nd, p34) They had no taste for engaging civilians in war, and soon moved on. Sigel's troops had reported from Maryland Heights that Early's troops had been passing over the river for 40 hours, non-stop. (Season)

 

July 7, 1864 - Charles Gilpin (no known relationship) with the 3rd Potomac Home Brigade of 700 men was sent by Wallace to Clendenin's aid at Monocacy Junction against the CSA. Towards the end of the day, Charles Gilpin was at Frederick skirmishing with the CSA. After 3 hours, Col. Gilpin charged his regiment of troops toward Rizer's corn field after the retreating Confederate's. Johnson withdrew his Colf. troops about 9 p.m. (Season)

 

At Washington, the citizens were in a panic, and it was reported that Early's troops could be seen approaching from the west, looking like a long column of dust. (Prisons & Escapes)

 

July 8, 1864 - Early's army moved on before morning and McCausland's Brigade helped take Catoctin Mountain. McCausland's men cut the telegraph connections to the right and destroyed railroad track, which connected Maryland Heights, Washington and Baltimore. Wallace, Col. Gilpin, Tyler & Clendenin's USA troops moved toward Monocacy Junction. Hundreds of citizens went with them. The US knew they were outnumbered but felt they should hold Early's movements up for at least a day to allow Grant time to move in to protect Washington. (Season)

 

Battle of Monocacy, Frederick Co., Maryland

 

(Unless indicated otherwise, much of the following regarding the movements of the 22nd Virginia Cavalry is mostly from Season of Fire, The Confederate Strike on Washington, by Joseph Judge, pages 183 through 198. Monocacy action took place around I-270 near the Monocacy River. On Rt. 355 before the River from Frederick is one of 4 monuments, at Monocacy Junction is a monument northern soldier.

 

2nd Army Corps of Northern Virginia, Army of the Valley District

 

I. Lt. General Jubal A. Early, Commander; II. Maj. General J. C. Breckenridge (became the youngest vice president of U.S., aged 35; a. Maj. General J. B. Gordon; b. Maj. Gen. S. D. Ramseur; c. Maj. Gen. Robert E. Rodes; d. Br. Gen. John Echols; e. Br. Gen. A. Long, artillery; f. Maj. Gen. Robert Ransom, Cavalry; 1. Imboden/Smith; 18th Va., 23 Va., 62 Va., McClannahans; 2. McCausland; 14, 16, 17, 2, 37 Va and on at least one occasion, the 22nd Cav.; 3. B. T. Johnson; 1st Md. 8th Va., 21st Va., 22nd Va.; 34th Va., 36th Va., Griffins-Md.; 4. "Mudwall" Jackson; 2nd Md., 19th Va., 20th Va., 46th Va.; 47th, Lurty's Va.

 

July 9, 1864 - Fighting broke out in various places: the railroad line, Jug bridge (at a log cabin), railraod station at Monocacy Junction, and at the covered bridge. "Tiger John" McCausland had his 14th, 16th, 17th and 22nd Virginia Cavalry come up from Jefferson after the shooting started. He had been from Harpers Ferry to Washington, tearing up telegraph lines. Season

 

"Tiger John's" men then began dismounting in a meadow, its fragrance sweet. About 1/4 of them led their mount back to the river and walked across. The rest were along a fence leading to the Worthington home, where its occupants watched the unfolding scene from their basement, as these soldiers crossed into the half-grown cornfield. About that time Wallace was sending a note to Ricketts, USA, who was elsewhere already under fire, to advance some of his men to, and conceal themselves behind, the cornfield fence. Season

McCausland's information had led him to believe the junction was guarded by 100-day troops and some national guards, but no regular troops. What they met was General Wallace who quickly ordered Ricketts troops to advance toward them, concealed behind the cornfield fence. Meanwhile, McCauslands men had stopped at the riverbank and dismounted, some taking their mounts to the riverside, the rest walking beside the fence that followed from the river to the Worthington home, and some of the confederate cavalry crossed the fence to the left into the waist high cornfield. These were probably the ones Wallace and Corbin noticed first. Season

 

Wallace later described this scene: ""[S]uddenly ... arms were shifted, and, taking to the double-quick, the [rebel] men raised their battle cry, which, sounding across the field and intervening distance, rose to me on the height, sharper, shriller, and more like the composite yelping of wolves than I had ever heard it .. a tempestuous tossing of guidon, waving of banners, and a furious trampling of the young corn that flew before them like splashed billows ... was more exciting - it was really fearful." Wallace wondered "whether the coming fire would 'hush the howling? Would it stop the rush'? Season

Lew Wallace never forgot watching McCausland's battle charge at Monocacy and later wrote of watching as "... across the cornfield through ... binoculars ... a spectacle I will never forget." J. B. Gordon had similar comment re the "audacity of that movement." McCausland was then 27 years old. Wallace's aide, Maj. Max Woodhull, could then be heard to have cried "My God! They are all killed!" The rebels had disappeared, leaving a few riderless horses prancing in the trodden cornfield, and a few mounted officers. After a few moments, the rail to the rear of the cornfield was darkened with the bodies of the rebels climbing across in retreat, some of the sections collapsing in their weight. Worthington wrote: "never saw another such terrible sight as an army shocked and frightened a this one was. The men dragged their muskets by the muzzle and their faces depicted the greatest terror. ... They were panic stricken by the deadly ambush into which they were unwittingly led." McCausland fell back. Season

 

July 10, 1864 - They marched at daylight. No longer in the lead, the 22nd cavalry marched on for 20 miles. The road to Rockville was long and tiring. It was eight feet wide and dirt. As they tramped down the road, because there had been no rain for several weeks, a brown dust and grit cloud filled the air. Wounds were covered with dust, spit was brown like the dust and creased skin was raw from trapped gritty dirt. The day was hot and humid, causing the men to straggle out, some to suffer sunstrokes. Behind them was Ramseur and H. K. Douglas. Season

 

McCausland was leading, their thirsty mounts were led as they went through Urbana, Hysttstown and Clarksburg. Refugees fled before the Confederate army, flooding Washington. The people were stunned that the Rebels were so close to the capitol, which was virtually unguarded. Near Gaithersburg, McCausland met with a small group of federals, briefly skirmishing before the federals fled. Early ate supper here. (See John T. DeSellum papers, Montgomery County Historical Society, Rockville, Maryland for scenes regarding Early.) (Season)

 

During the night of the 10th (Sunday night) Washington gathered all they could to defend the city from Early's army. Two thousand warehouse workers and file clerks were gratefully accepted as temporary volunteers, along with the invalids, reserves, 100-day men and regular volunteers. They were desperately hoping Hunter or Grant would arrive in time to save them. In the dark of the night, a squad of soldiers were sent to bring their commander-in-chief back into town. Lincoln and his son, Todd, rode the carriage back during the night to safety. (Season)

 

Monday, July 11, 1864 - Marching again at daylight, as usual the dawn was warm and the air heavy. The oppressive and stifling night had not allowed much rest for the men. Early sent his army down in two directions to Washington. McCausland's cavalry again in the lead as they headed southward down Georgetown Pike towards Montrose, the rest went east. They passed bloated and stinking horse carcasses at Rockville, Md., where they briefly skirmished. They would skirmish sporadically throughout the morning with USA Fry. The day became very hot and the heat and dust choked at their lungs. Many fell by the way, too exhausted to go any further. According to Quaker Farquhar, it was 94 degrees that day. Their weapons reflected the sunshine and waves of heat floated up from the earth. Fry and his outnumbered troops were ahead of McCausland. Season

On another road that paralleled the one they were one was a cabin, which became the subject in the famous Uncle Tom's Cabin and the area written about in that book by Harriett Beecher Stowe was this same area. Season

 

It was about twelve miles to Washington and the men were exhausted. The dust clouds choked at their lungs and the thick stuffy air smothered them. McCausland skirmished again near Bethesda and they were blocked by the Federals from entering Washington. (Fed. Col. Charles R. Lowell met with the 10th, 15, 19th and 22nd Va. Cav. according to Lowell) (22nd, p38) McCausland, with his horse-artillery and cavalry, reported that the works on Georgetown Pike were too strong to assault. Season

 

Elisha Rhodes of the 2nd Rhode Island wrote about Early's attack on Ft. Stevens in the Washington suburbs:

On the parapet I saw President Lincoln ... Mrs. Lincoln and other ladies were sitting in a carriage behind the earthworks. ... as the President and many ladies were looking on, every man tried to do his best ... The Rebels broke and fled ... Early should have attacked early in the morning. Early was late. (The Civil War)

Elisha noted that when they first arrived in Washington to help repel Early, "many citizens had guns in their hands." (The Civil War, p312.) McCausland reached Urbana where they drove off a Federal cavalry.

 

Charles R. Lowell Jr, 2nd Mass. Cavalry, USA, to Br. Gen. Hardin, regarding the pursuit of the Confederate forces, 12-14 of July, 1864: "... By small parties I had learned that the rebel force did not extend far up the pike. I therefore moved across the north from River Road, and, dismounting three companies, turned the enemy's right flank. We drove them back ... and Lt. Col. Crownshield moved them at same time about one mile up the Rockville pike. A prisoner reports the force on the Rockville pike to be ... McCausland's cavalry brigade, of Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Nineteenth, and Twenty-second Virginia Cavalry. The band was that of the Fourteenth. He knows of no infantry on that road. They have, I presume, a battery, but have only shown one or perhaps two guns." (War, I Vol 37 p250)

 

McCausland moved on to Georgetown. Washington and the nearly completed capitol dome was visible from this location and the capitol's dome sparkled in the sun. McCausland was the only Confederate General to come close enough to clearly view the Federal capitol. Unknown to them, President Lincoln was at Fort Stevens. Lincoln and his wife and Secretary of War Stanton took a carriage out to Fort Stevens and while on the parapet viewing the battle, a minnie' ball ricocheted, wounding the surgeon Crawford in the thigh, not far from the President. For the only time during the Civil War, the President was under direct fire. One view of what happened next was that Federal Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. pulled at Lincoln's sleeve and yelled "get down you damn fool". The President got down. Season

 

Early had now received word that seasoned troops had arrived to defend Washington and Early now thought twice about an assault. Skirmishers were left to cover their withdrawal. 600 Confederate prisoners arrived at Elmira NY from Pt. Lookout, Md., now totaling 1250.

 

July 13, 1864 - Lowell, USA, Fort Reno, l3 July l864 regarding the rebels: "Their first picket was about one mile from here. Have sent out to try and take it, but fear it has already withdrawn. Their rear guards left the Bethesda Church about 4 a.m. The main body [McCAusland's cavalry brigade] fell back about midnight. Have sent a company to move up the roads to the left, and have now sent another to go to the right, to the old city turnpike, from Leesborough to Rockville, to see what is there and to pick up stragglers." (War, Series I Vol 37 p251)

 

Though they succeeded in drawing the Federal troops from Richmond, their efforts to reach and free Confederate POW's from Pt. Lookout were unsuccessful. Pt. Lookout was a prison camp made with lodgings of tents. McCausland's cavalry brigade guarded the left flank of Early's Confederate army as they withdrew into Virginia. In addition to the Federals having sent extra troops of Grant's to protect Washington, upon the arrival of this Confederate threat to the Union, a heat wave covered the land, causing near drought conditions. Season

 

They left behind burning or smoking houses, corpses in fields. The Federals and townspeople were relieved - though left with the task of burying the dead from both sides, who lay all over the countryside. Lowell's 2nd Mass. Cavalry from ft. Reno down Rockville Pike - met CSA about 9 a.m. and skirmished - Johnson took 60 prisoners near Rockville. McCausland chose not to take the popular River Fords, some unsuitable for infantry and artillery to cross - he went down River road to Edward's and Conrad's ferries. Hunter's troops never made it to help protect Washington from this raid. Season

 

Back to Virginia

 

July, 1864 - The Confederate army crossed the Potomac at White's Ford or Edward's Ferry, near Leesburg into Loudon County, Maryland, taking with them the contraband and 1500 horses, and over 2000 cattle. General Horation Wright, US, was at Poolesville, Md., but didn't pursue the confederates into Virginia.

 

By now, the stagnant water at Elmira Prison had become a concern. Not only was the water stagnant, but the many prisoners daily urinated near it and/or in it. (Prisons and Escapes)

 

July 15th & 16th, 1864 - With the rise of the sun came the rise of another possible battle. When John woke he probably didn't notice the sounds of the waking men - they were no doubt fatigued, sweaty, dirty and uncomfortable from the vermin residing in their clothes. Their clothing was becoming worn - their stomachs probably grumbled from the lack of a proper meal. The sounds of daybreak were probably almost unnoticeable to those participants of this "theater of war" as they wondered what lay ahead and wearily prepared for another day of retreat. Life resumed in the camp parameters as orders were shouted and the men prepared to leave after their brief rest.

 

The exhausted Confederates had camped for two days in Loudon County and resumed their march on July 16th. Hunter and Franz Sigel (US) were said to be at Harpers Ferry and Crook's men were in Hillsboro, in Loudon County. Early's cavalry was covering their retreat, guarding their rear from the enemy to make sure the wagon train and infantry retreated safely with their supplies and booty. The 22nd Virginia Infantry was also with Early's army, and was with that part of the wagon train attacked at Purcellville. John Gilpin may have known some of them, they may possibly even have been related by marriage: George W. Karnes, Corp/Sgt, Co. B, Jackson Co., WV, and James Baber Karnes, Pvt., Co. H, of Craig County Virginia, enlisted at Monroe County and was later to be on Alleghany County, Virginia pension roll. 22nd

 

McCausland's cavalry brigade crossed the Potomac River at White's Ford near Leesburg into Loudon County, Virginia on the 14th with federal prisoners, captured small arms and artillery, loot and ransom money. The men were given two days respite in Loudon and on the 16th resumed their march. Hunter and Sigel were at Harper's Ferry and Crooks' Federals were at Hillsboro in Loudon County in pursuit.

 

As Early's army moved on in their retreat toward Snicker's Gap (Blueridge Mountains), they passed through Purcellville, Loudon County, VA, where they were attacked. The Federal army captured part of Early's "wagon train" including some of the "booty or spoils" they had captured from Maryland. It appears that the Federals had finally woke up and made feeble attempts of retaliation for Early's move on Washington and the countryside. Season

 

Of the 22nd Virginia cavalry, one confederate was taken prisoner at Loudon County, John Gilpin, on the 16th and William Stillwell was taken prisoner at Harpers Ferry, during this part of their retreat. 22nd John Gilpin was said to have been captured by Hunter's men. It isn't clear yet if John was captured at Purcellville, though he was captured in that same county. (Prison Register no. 304, part 783, pg 168 for Gilpin)

On July 19, 1864, Wiley Newton of 22nd Virginia Cavalry, Co. F. wrote home:

We have had a vary hard time for the last two months, we are just back from Maryland. ... we had hard fighting and marching to doo ... (22nd Va. Cavalry)

CAPTURED - The war and McCausland's men went on while Pvt. John Gilpin was taken prisoner in Loudon County, Virginia on the 16th. The lettering for the location is unreadable on my copy (_a_______ __rry Va) but is probably readable on an original. This may or may not be Harpers Ferry, Va. (Roll 22 sheet 3) By the 20th John was at the Old Capitol Prison in Washington. (Listed on Register of Prisoners No 304, part 783, page 168) The shelter at this camp consisted of tents.

 

The soldiers had undergone so much prior to capture, including exposure to the elements, psychological stress from the fighting and traveling, as well as the stress of the actual capture. Then the transportation to the prison, a hostile environment. John Gilpin was possibly 41 years old, and after all he had been through over the previous several months, may have been weaker and less healthy than a younger soldier. The first two weeks after capture would have been critical to his survival as a prisoner. (Prisons & Escapes)

 

Elmira, NY, Prison Camp, Register #1, page 60

John Gilpin, William Stilwell and William L. Smith were then sent to Elmira, NY, a harsh prison camp of 40 acres near the Chemug River, which was to have a death rate of twice that of other northern prison camps. His prison records conflict as to his military situation, lists incorrectly as being in Co. A and Co. F, 22 Reg. Va. Artillery. The prison camp at Pt. Lookout, Maryland was overflowing and Elmira was where they decided to ship some of the overflow, using a ship from Beel Plain, on steamers to New York and by railroad to Elmira.

 

Elmira prison camp was under U.S. Commissary-General of Prisoners, Col. Wm. Hoffman, who bragged that he had killed more rebels than any regular soldier. This he achieved through a lack of food and unhealthy conditions. Scurvy was common, as well as its cause, malnutrition. The 35 barracks were made to hold 5,000 men, and after being open only two months, was close to capacity with 4,400 prisoners. The first prisoners arrived the first part of July and by the end of August, it held 10,000 men. Prisons & Escapes

 

I originally thought John died of wounds received when he was captured but I do not find any record of this, one way or another. The conditions at Elmira were said to have been extremely bad. Upon arrival, the soldier was likely to have been robbed of all but the clothes he wore, not even left sometimes with a blanket to cover with at night when the northern climate of New York dipped down low. At night when the fires were lit, the strong prisoners took a place up close to the fire and the weak were left to shiver and freeze, sheltered by only their tattered clothing at the outer parameters of the circle of men. There were not enough blankets for them all, and was never enough food. Men bartered what little they had with them for food and were forced to fight over even rat meat. Often, the bread prisoners received was made from "Unbolted" cornmeal, which contained hard indigestible bran, which many times resulted in life-long stomach disorders, and led to disability for some. (Civil War Prisons & Escapes)

 

The psychological impact was devastating. The positive side of this prison was that it had barracks to keep out the fiercest of the elements. However, the barracks were "shanties", the beds were planks, many times with no blanket, and only straw. The inmates were often dirty, pale, emaciated, with scanty clothing. It was guarded by Home Guards, who were apt to be more abusive to the prisoners than an active soldier. Elmira was nicknamed "Helmira", and it was at this prison that the Commander of Andersonville Prison Camp in the south, Capt. Henry Wirz, CSA, was imprisoned until he was sentenced and hung on 10 Nov 1864. (Civil War Prisons & Escapes)

 

Drinking water could not be trusted as it was most likely stagnant, and/or contaminated with insect larvae or worse. Almost 50,000 men would die in prison camps during the civil war. One-fourth of those who went to Elmira would die, the total being imprisoned there was 12,123. Elmira Prison Camp was commanded by Co. B. F. Tracy, who was over the 127th Colored Troops. (Prisons & Escapes)

 

Co. Huffman reported to Sec. of War a report re: Tracy and his medical officers failed to follow ordered re: precautions for unnecessary suffering by POW's - entransit to south and also "neglected the ordinary promptings of humanity in the performance of their duties towards sick men, thus showing themselves to be wholly unfit for the positions they occupy, and it is respectfully recommended that they be immediately ordered to some other service" (Prisons & Escapes, p282) There was also a report of 1 Nov l864 re: Sep 28/7? re report on bad conditions in October at Camp - disease - deaths - etc. - good summary. Page 302 refers to cracks in walls and cold winters, page 303 re letters to POWs from Col Huffman re exchange and false hope.

 

29 Sep 1864, Prisons & Escapes, p256, a letter regarding instructions from Col. William Hoffman, Federal Commissary - General of Prisoners to Col. B. F. Tracy at Elmira re: preparation of journey of sick paroled prisoners: two days cooked rations and water, medical supervision, Quartermaster at Baltimore would provide transportation to Point Lookout.

 

On October 11, 1864, after less than three months, having arrived about July 25, 1864, John was paroled (Elmira NY Register No 1 page 60?) but was unable to last long enough to make it home. He was listed on the roll of invalid prisoners sent from Elmira, N.Y. to Point Lookout, Md. to be traded back to the confederacy in a prisoner exchange. The information indicates that his name is a signature, though I do not know if it is his, on the Roll of prisoners paroled at Elmira NY Oct 11, l864, roll not dated. They chose only the wounded and critically ill prisoners for this exchange. He was sent to Pt. Lookout October 16, 1864 to participate in an exchange which included only sick and wounded prisoners. (Roll 1 sheet 16)

 

A note on John Gilpin's card: "Received, Nov. 15th, 1864, at Venus Point, Savannah River, from John E. Mulford, Lt. Col. and Asst. Agt. for Exchange. Three thousand and Twenty-three (3023) Paroled Confederate Prisoners of War on within Rolls, including; Four Citizens and Four (4) Surgeons and Seventy-four others. - W. H. Hatch, Asst. Agent of Ezch." Taken from roll No. 76, Pt. Lookout, Md. Duplicate filed under 487 T (O.C.P.) Oct 26?, l864, show this roll of invalid prisoners sent from Elmira, N.Y. to Point Lookout via Baltimore, Md." (Prisons & Escapes, page 256, 258)

 

Letter from Medical Director at Baltimore, Md., Surgeon Simpson, l3 Oct l864, to Hoffman, Prisons and Escapes, page 269, re: over l200 prisoners arrived via railroad at Baltimore Maryland from Elmira, on their way to City Point, Virginia for exchange. Many were sick, some died on the way. 60 were taken off the train and did not continue on, being admitted to the West Hospital / General Hospital "debilitated as a result of long term sickness and they had to be carried in the arms of the attendants. Five of those were dead, and one other died. Surgeon A. Chapel to Surgeon J. Simpson 14 Oct l864; Surgeon C. f. H. Campbell to Surgeon Simpson; Prisons and Escapes, page 271, five died on the train and one died at General Hospital - in the arms of the attendant while being loaded on to the ambulance. Prisons & Escapes

 

On 29 September Col. William Hoffman sent instructions re: shipment of sick and wounded prisoners shipment from Elmira to south for exchange. The train arrived 13 Oct at Baltimore for transfer to steamer to City Point, Virginia. Senior officer on train, Major Roberts, reported to Office of Medical Director re: several prisoners died en route and many sick. The Medical Director, Surgeon J. Simpson, directed his staff doctors to examine the sick before departure. Surgeon C. F. H. Campbell sent 60 of the prisoners to the local general hospital and another died while being loaded into ambulance. Surgeon Simpson forwarded reports from Campbell and Surgeon Chapel to Col. Hoffman. (Prisons and Escapes, p282)

 

On October 13th or 14th, 1864 John was admitted to the U.S.A. General Hospital #457, West Building, Baltimore, Maryland, (Maryland Register No. 77, Hospital No. 57?, card #193-68) and there died at about 41 years of age. Mary was a widow at 27, the children fatherless at ages 10, 8, 6, and 3. A red line was drawn through his name. He was buried on October 15, 1864 at Loudon Park Cemetery in Maryland. (Register of Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Who died In Federal Prisons and Military Hospitals in the North (War Dept., 1912)

 

Letter from Campbell to Simpson dated l3 Oct l864: "[these] Men should not have been sent from Elmira. If they were inspected ... in accordance with orders it was most carelessly done ... and is ... disgraceful to all concerned. ... Five men had died on the train on the road to this city from utter prostration and debility, their appearance after death bearing evidence of this fact. Thus it will be seen six men have died from the number sent, and ... many more deaths would have been added..." Simpson to Hoffman: "The condition of these men was pitiable in the extreme and evinces criminal neglect and inhumanity on the part of the medical officers making the selection of men to be transferred." Prisons & Escapes

 

It was autumn and the leaves of the trees were probably turning to beautiful shades as nature prepared for its slumber. Some of the illnesses of prisoners were variola and erysipelas. I do not know that they are yet, but will try to find out. John's comrade, William Stilwell, later died of chronic diarrhea on November 16, 1864 and William L. Smith died January 31, 1865 of pneumonia. 22nd Diarrhea (chronic) was probably the prisoner's worst enemy next to starvation.

 

Gilpin, John Co. F. POW Loudon Co., to Elmira NY; Smith, William L. Co. H. POW Harpers Ferry, to Elmira 7/23; Combs, Alexander M. Co. A. WIA by 10/31/64; Conly, Isaac Co. C. WIA by 10/31/64; Fugate, John Co. A WIA by 10/31/64; Fugate, Robert B. Co. A WIA by 10/31/64; Dean, Elias Co. A WIA by 10/31/64; Trowbridge, Francis Co. E POW - sent to Elmira (22nd)

 

John went to his resting place amidst strangers. I have to wonder if he died feeling a free man, or still a prisoner at the hand of the enemy. I do not know if a certificate of death can be obtained. This needs to be checked out. Perhaps the military transcription of his war record will be the only death certificate we will ever have.

 

***** THE BEGINNING OF THE END OF THE WAR *****

 

In August the following description was given of Elmira: scurvy present and extra ration of cabbage, potatoes or onions recommended; new straw would help accommodate 400 patients in hospital there; took 2 to 3 hours to feed all; buildings unfit, messhouse was filthy, wards 2 & 4 unused re lack of straw; weather unseasonably cold, no stoves in the quarters; poor drainage and unhealthy conditions at stagnant pond; many in tents; no floors or blankets; sinks are offensive (were these actual sinks or some type of toilet?). Prisons & Escapes

 

20 Oct l864, Col. B. F. Tracy admitted in a letter to Col. Hoffman regarding the reasons for the rate of mortality for the last two months at Elmira: "probable causes ... including the insufficiency of the present diet and clothing to maintain the standard of health in this climate, the effects of the pool of stagnant water in the center of the camp..." (Prisons & Escapes, p__)

 

24 Oct l864 Hoffman to Sec. of War regarding those in charge at Elmira prison camp: "neglected the ordering promptings of humanity in the performance of their duties towards sick men, thus showing themselves to be wholly unfit for the positions they occupy..."(Prisons & Escapes, p__)

 

1 Nov l864 (p287) Surgeon E. F. Sanger at Elmira to U. S. Army Surgeon General at Washington:

"... for the month of October ... The ratio of disease and deaths has been fearfully and unprecendentedly large ... since August ... there have been 20ll patients admitted to the hospital, 775 deaths ... or 24 percent, admitted and 9 percent died. ... an aggregate of l052 per day, sick. At this rate ... 36 percent die.

... a stagnant pond ... received the contents of the sinks and garbage of the camp until it became so offensive that vaults were dug on the banks of the pond for sinks and the whole left a festering mass of corruption, impregnating the entire atmosphere of the camp with its pestilential odors, night and day.

... the existence of scurvy to an alarming extent (reporting 2000 scourbutic cases at one time): ... How does the matter stand today? The pond remains given with putrescence, filling the air with its messengers of disease and death, ... the hospitals are crowded with victims for the grave.

... The men are hurried in to their rations of bread, beans, meat, and soup, to half gulp it down on the spot or to carry it hastily away to their quarters in old rusty canteens and improvised dirty dippers and measures.

... when the sick were sent from here for exchange ... I did not receive my supplies, and the patients were sent off without coffee or sugar. The train started without reporting to the medical officer, and before the nurses were assigned, blankets distributed, and many had been fed after a fast of more than 12 hours.

Surgeon Sanger at Elmira complained that he had to put up with a camp inspector who would ... order pneumonia patients with blisters on their sides bathed, ..."

 

*****

September 19, 1864, while John was wasting in the prison camp, the 22nd (Bowen's dragoons) and others faced General George Armstrong Custer's 7th Cavalry Brigade of Michigan at Opequon Creek, Locke's Ford. (Battle of Winchester) The 22nd Virginia Cavalry flag was captured at Ninevah by Sgt. Levi Shoemaker of the 1st W.Va. Cavalry, who won a Congressional Medal of Honor for this act (Nov l7, l864). By December 31, 1864, of the last surviving muster rolls for the 22nd only 96 men were listed. January 1864 McCausland led cavalry back to western Virginia for winter quarters. Many were furloughed or deserted. General Fitzhugh Lee told McCausland "Uncle Bobby has surrendered..." McCausland had only 27 men to be paroled at Appomattox courthouse. Only two of these were of the 22nd. From the 22nd, 4 POW's were sent to Elmira, New York, three died before the war ended, one was exchanged. (22nd)

 

The Egyptian ruler is said to have offered McCausland (while at Paris) a high rank in the Egyptian army. McCausland was later received by Mexico's emperor, Maximilian. After Mexico's fall to "Jaurists" McCausland eventually made his way back to W.Va. (by l868). In l868 the President issued a blanket amnesty for all former Confederates.

 

*******

 

General Lee surrendered to Grant on April 9, 1865 at Appomattox, Virginia and Johnson surrendered on April 26, 1865. McCausland never surrendered.

"'The predication is made that the future historian will say that, while the Armies of the North saved the Union from dissolution, the Armies of the South saved the rights of the States within the Union.'" World Scope Encyclopedia, Rockville House Publishers, Inc., N.Y., N.Y., (1969)

 

*****

Bibliography

 

22nd Virginia Cavalry, Jeffrey C. Weaver, 1st Ed., (H.E. Howard Inc., Lynchburg Va) Virginia Regimental Series, 1991

Unreconstructed Rebel: The Life of General John McCausland, C.S.A., Michael J. Pauley (Pictorial Histories Publishing Co., Inc., Charleston, WV 1993)

National Archives Civil War Records

Federal Census, 1850, 1860, Tazewell County, Virginia

The Civil War, an Illustrated History by Geoffrey C. Ward with Ric Burns & Ken Burns (Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., N.Y., 1990)

Immigration and Naturalization Index for Alien Declaration

War of the Rebellion, A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series l, compiled by the U.S. War Department., issued by Government Printing Office (1889, l880-l901) 128 volumes, (used mostly Vol. 33, 36, 37, part 2, 47)

Military Operations, 1861-1864, by Milton Wylie Humphries, Bryan's Battery, King's Artillery, C.S.A., (Cotton Hill Publications, P.O. Box 828, Gauley Bridge, WV

Season of Fire, The Confederate Strike on Washington, by Joseph Judge, Rockbridge Publishing Co., P.O. Box 351, Berryville, Va., 22611 (1994) copyright by Joseph Judge.

Civil War, Prisons & Escapes; A Day-By-Day Chronicle, by Robert E. Denney

World Scope Encyclopaedia, Rockville House Publishing Inc., NY, NY, 1969

 

Further Reading

 

Our Dead Keiley, A.M. Address delivered at Loudon Park Cemetery near Baltimore 6-5-1879 at the confederate graves, 14p

Early's Raid on Washington, AWC, by Charles Wendell Fenton, March 1916

Early's Raid in l864, ..., (1914-14) by Abner Pickering

Life and Letters of Charles Russell Lowell, by Edward W. Emerson, Boston, Houghton Mifflin Co. l907

History of 8th Ill. Cavalry Regiment, Ill. Volunteers..., by Abner Hard, l868, re: Monocacy

Also check history on 2nd Mass. Cav. and Fry

Monocacy National Battlefield ) Unpublished National Pk

Susan Moore Superintendant ) Service manuscript by

Kathy Beeing Historian ) Edwin C. Bearss, Chief

Historian, hour by hour acct.

Deaths in Northern Prisons "Confederate Veteran" XXXVII (1929) 157

Civil War Prisons by Hesseltine,William B., Kent State Un. Press., 1962, Kent Oh

Civil War Prisons ..., Columbus Ohio State Un. Press, l920

Prison Life Among the Rebels by Edward D. Jevey, Kent State Un. Press, l990, Kent Oh

July 1, l864, letter from Maj. Gen. Samual Jones CSA to Foster --- re exchange of prisoners to relieve suffering on both sides.

The Battle of Monocacy by Edward Y. Goldsborough (Historical Society of Frederick, Md., 1898)

Manuscripts and Public documents to read

 

Pvt. David Lumpkin Eubanks Memoir, courtesty of Dyer Eubanks, Smyrna, Georgia & Keith Bohannon, Marietta, Georgia.

Letters from Pvt. Wiley K. Newton, courtesty of Dan Bailey, Tazewell Va., (Scott Cole, Cedar Bluff, Va., has his picture - elderly man by then)

United States National Archives & Records Administration:

Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers who served in Organizations from the State of Virginia, Record Group 109, 22nd Va. Cavalry, Microcopy 324, Rolls 169-171.

Virginia Department of Archives & History, Richmond, Virginia, Virginia State Library Pension Applications, Confederate Soldiers made under Acts 1888, 1900 & 1902.


 

50)  http://www.lcarver.com/john.html

 

 

 

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Givans_George_H_sm George H. Givans – [Plot C-52; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Pvt. Richard C. Glass – [Plot F-56; Unreadable] ADOPTED

Glass_Richard_C(SM)

 

Reburied from Virginia, 1874.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Pvt. Samuel Thomas Glenn – [Plot C-32; Readable] ADOPTED

 

Samuel_Thomas_Glenn

Pvt., Co. C (3rd), 1st Md. Inf. & Co. A, 2nd Md. Inf. b. circa 1839, Queen Anne's Co., Md. Res. of Talbot Co., Md. Enl. Co. B, 39th Va. Inf. 8/29/61. Disbanded 2/6/62. Reenl. Co. C, 61st Va. Inf. 2/11/62. Transf. Co. C, 1st Md. Inf. 3/26/62. Discharged 8/17/62. Reenl. Co. A, 2nd Md. Inf. 8/28/62. WIA (arm) Gettysburg 7/3/63. Present 3/31/64. Ab. sick with chronic diarrhea in Richmond hospital 7/29/64. Furloughed for 35 days 8/22/64. Returned to duty 9/28/64. Present 10/31/64-2/28/65. Captured Hatcher's Run 4/2/65. Sent to Point lookout. Released 6/12/65. 5' 11", brown hair, grey eyes. Member, Army & Navy Society, Maryland Line Association. Entered Old Soldiers' Home, PikesvilIe, Md. Talbot Co. 6/18/88 age 49, Clerk. d. there 9/14/19 age 81. Bur. Loudon Park Cem., Baltimore.

 

23) Driver, Page 421

 

Born in Queen Anne County, MD. Enlisted August 29, 1861, at Eastville, VA, as a private in Company B, Thirty-ninth Virginia Infantry….Was wounded at Gettysburg June 3, 1863, in the lower part of the arm.

 

1) Toomey, Page 53.

 

Died 9/14/1919, aged 81.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Dennison L. Godwin – [Plot D-37; Barely Readable] ADOPTED

Godwin_Dennison_L_SM.jpg

 

Buried 5/15/1862.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

DENNIS L. GODWIN, D-37, N/A

 

US Civil War Soldiers 1861-1865

Dennison L. Godwin

Confederate NC

5 N.C. Inf., Co. F

Rank in/out: Private

M230 Roll 15

 

US Civil War Soldiers Records and Profiles

Dennison L. Godwin

Residence: Hertford Co., NC

Occupation: Farmer

Age at Enlistment: 27

Enlisted: 6 Nov 1861 as a Private at Hertford Co., NC

Served: NC

Survived War: No

Mustered out at Baltimore, Md.

Promoted to Full Qtr. Master Sergeant on 3 Oct. 1861

Enlisted in Co. F, NC 5th Inf. Reg. on 11 June 1861

Promoted to Full Private on 30 Jan. 1862

Born: Abt. 1834

North Carolina Troops, 1861-1865, A Roster

 

American Civil War Soldiers

Dennison Godwin

Residence: Hertford Co., NC

Occupation: Farmer

Enlisted: 11 June 1861 at Hertford Co., NC

Confederate NC

Died as a prisoner in Co. F, 5th Inf. Reg. NC at Baltimore, Md.

Enlisted as a Private on 11 June 1861 at the age of 27

Promoted to Full Quartermaster Sergeant 3 Oct. 1861

Promoted to Full Private (Reduced to ranks) 30 Jan. 1862

 

Civil War Prisoner of War Records-Register of Confederates who died in federal prisons and Military hospitals in the North, 1861-1865

 

Godwin, Dennis L. ---------------- May 15, 1862 buried Loudon Park Confederate lot, A77

 

1850 US Federal Census-NC-Hertford-Northern District

 

Kenny Godwin

42

Farmer

NC

Sarah Godwin

44

 

NC

Margaret Godwin

75

 

NC

Denison Godwin

17

 

NC

Samuel Godwin

14

 

NC

Margaret Godwin

11

 

NC

Kenneth R. Godwin

7

 

NC

Amelia Godwin

5

 

NC

 

 

 

 

1860 UD Federal Census-NC-Hertford

 

 

 

Denison Godwin

26

Field Laborer

Hertford NC

 

The (Baltimore) Sun, 16 May 1862

Another Wounded Prisoner Dead—Dennison L. Goodwin, a private in the 5th North Carolina Volunteers, died at the city jail yesterday morning, from wounds received at the battle of Williamsburg.  He leaves a wife and several children in North Carolina.  His remains were interred in the government lot at Loudon Park Cemetery.

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

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Major William W. Goldsborough – [Plot H-02; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

image006

Born 1831, Died 12/25/1901, aged 67. Cousin of Bradley T. Johnson. Joined the Confederate Army as a Private in the spring of 1861. Elected Captain of Company A, 1st Maryland Infantry (C.S.), upon the promotion of Johnson to Major. Later served as a Major in the 2nd Maryland Infantry (C.S.). Wounded and captured at Gettysburg. Imprisoned as one of the "Immortal 600."

 

11) Courtesy of Co. C, 2nd Maryland Infantry, CSA. http://users.erols.com/driden/WWGoldsborough.htm

 

 

William_W_Goldsborough(sm)

Captain, Co. A, 1st Md. Inf. & Major, 2nd Md. Inf. b. "Graceham," Frederick Co., Md. 10/6/31. Att. schools in Hanover, Pa. Printer, Pittsburgh, Pa. and Baltimore circa 1850. Enl. Co. C (2nd), 1st Md. Inf. Richmond 5/17/61 as Pvt. Promoted Captain, Company A 5/21/61. Present 6-12/61. Reenl. 2/8/62. Paid 3/3/62. Present 3/28/62. Signed for 66 pair of shoes, 11 caps, 3 overcoats, 28 jackets and 20 pair of paints for company 4/30/62. Present Front Royal (where his brother Charles was captured while serving in the 1st Md. Inf. U. S.) and Winchester. WIA (side) Harrisonburg 6/6/62. Present Cross Keys and Seven Days campaign (commanded company in 48th Va. Inf.). Paid 6/20/62 and 8/17/62. Served as Aide de camp to Col. Bradley T. Johnson (his cousin) and WIA 2nd Manassas 8/30/62. Raised Co. G, 2nd Md. Inf. Richmond 12/14/62. Present Staunton 12/30/62. Joined regiment at New Market 1/2/63. Elected Major 1/26/63. Commanding regiment 4/25/63. Present Winchester 6/13/63. Commanding regiment 6/23/63. WIA (through left side and lungs and back) and captured Gettysburg 7/3/63 while commanding the regiment. Sent to Letterman hospital. Transf. West buildings hospital, Baltimore. Transf. Ft. McHenry, Ft. Delaware, Hilton Head, S.C., Ft. Pulaski, Ga. and back to Ft. Delaware. One of the "Immoral 600." Released 6/12/65. 5'11", fair complexion, light hair, brown eyes, res. of Baltimore. Established Winchester, Va. Times and Philadelphia. Pa. Record in 1870-1890. Foreman, Tacoma Daily Globe, Washington. Foreman Everett Herald & Sun. Member, Army & Navy Society, Maryland Line Association. Assistant Newspaper shop foreman Philadelphia Record, 1894 until run over by a bicycle in 1896 and forced to use crutches. d. Philadelphia 12/25/01. As he lay dying he told his wife "Don't bury me among the damn Yankees here." Bur. Loudon Park Cem., Baltimore. Wrote "The Maryland Line in the Confederate States Army" in 1869. Reprinted with enlarged edition in 1900.

 

23) Driver, Page 422

 

 WILLIAM W. GOLDSBOROUGH, Lot H-02, 2nd MD Inf.

 

US Civil War Soldiers 1861-1865

William W. Goldsborough

Confederate  MD

2 Battn MD. Inf., Co. G

Rank in: Captain

Rank out: Major

 

American Civil War Soldiers

William Goldsborough

Residence: Baltimore, MD

Enlisted: 17 May 1861, Richmond, VA

Confederate  VA

Born: 6 Oct 1831

Died: 25 Dec 1901, Philadelphia, PA

Enlisted as Private at the age of 29 in Co. C., 1st Inf. Reg. MD.

Promoted to Full Captain (As of Co. C) 25 June 1861

Discharged from Co. C 17 aug 1862

Promoted to Full Captain (As of 48th VA Inf) 30 Aug 1862

Commission in 48th Inf. Reg VA 30 Aug 1862

Discharged for promotion from 48th Inf. Reg. VA 14 Dec 1862

Commission in Co. G., 2nd Inf. Reg. MD., 12 Dec 1862

Promoted to Full Captain (As of Co. G) 14 Dec 1862

Promoted to Full Major 26 Jan 1863

Height: 5’11”    Eyes: Brown   Hair: Light    Complexion: Fair

 

63)  Courtesy Ms. Ms. Lisa Lockett.

 

The (Baltimore) Sun, 26 December 1901-News Article

                        MAJOR GOLDSBOROUGH DEAD

Gallant Confederate Officer Passes Away In Philadelphia

   News was received in Baltimore last evening by Col. Winfield Peters and Capt. G. W. Booth, acting president of the society of the confederate Army and Navy of the death in Philadelphia of Major W. W, Goldsborough, who was esteemed one of the bravest officers in the Confederate service.  A telegram was sent to the Major’s widow, Mrs. Louise Goldsborough, 2227 South Rosewood street, Philadelphia, asking her to send the remains to Baltimore, where they will be buried with military honors in Loudon Park.

   Major Goldsborough was well known to many Baltimoreans, especially old Confederates, and they all spoke of him in the highest terms as one of the most gallant and _______ men in the Southern army, _________ been especially ________ for bravery.  He entered the First Maryland Regiment, Confederate States Army, at the beginning of the war as a private.  Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, then captain of Company A, who was a cousin of the deceased, was promoted to major in June 1861, and urged upon the company the selection of
Private Goldsborough as captain.  This was done and he filled the office as long as the regiment was in existence.

   He participated in the campaigns in the Valley of Virginia and in the first battle of Manassas in 1861, and was in the seven days battles below Richmond in the spring and summer of 1862.  Gen. Stonewall Jackson placed Col. Bradley T. Johnson in command of a brigade in the Stonewall Jackson Division and Colonel Johnson placed Captain Goldsborough in command of a regiment.  At the same time Colonel Johnson made Captain Booth his adjutant general.

   This brigade was in the desperate fight in the railroad ____ at the second battle of Manassas.  In August 1862, when Captain Goldsborough was severely and it was thought at the time mortally wounded He recovered and took command of a company in the Second Maryland Infantry, being shortly afterward elected major under Lieut. Col. James R. Herbert.  This regiment was in the ______ attack on the Federal General Milroy’s force at Winchester, which resulted in the capture of almost all of Milroy’s command.

   In the Battle of Gettysburg Major Goldsborough commanded the regiment, Colonel Herbert having been severely wounded some time before.  The Second Maryland took part in the desperate attack on Culp’s Hill on the left of the Confederate line Major Goldsborough placed the right of the regiment in the command of the gallant Captain Murray, who was killed while leading his men and he led the left.  Two-thirds of the total number of men in the regiment were killed or wounded in the attack, including Major Goldsborough.  He was captured by the Federal troops and remained a prisoner until the close of the war.

   Colonel Herbert and Major Goldsborough were among the five or six hundred Confederate officers placed within range of the fire of the Confederate batteries at Charleston, S.C. during the _____Federal assault on that city.  Prior to the war Major Goldsborough  lived in Baltimore, being engaged in the newspaper business.  While here he was a member of the Baltimore City Guards Battalion.  After the war he secured a position on the Philadelphia Records, where he was actively engaged, except for short periods, up to about five years ago when he was run into by a bicyclist and had his thigh crushed.  After this last accident he had to use crutches.

   Major Goldsborough wrote many sketches and articles for the Record on historical incidents of the war relating to Marylanders.  For some time he had been engaged in compiling his work in connection with the Maryland Confederates under a contract with a New York publisher.

   In 1879 Major Goldsborough issued a work entitled ‘ The Confederate Line in the Confederate States Army.’    Some five years ago he rewrote this volume, but being for business reasons unable to complete the details.  It was finished, edited and published by Capt. G. W. Booth.

 

The (Baltimore) Sun, 28 December 1901

LAST BUT ONE TO LIVE

Major Goldsborough’s Part In The Battle Of Gettysburg

LED RUSH ON CULP’S HILL

Desperately Wounded And Taken With Other Marylanders To Widow Wilble’s House

   An old comrade of Major W.W. Goldsborough sends the following reminiscences to The Sun.

   “The death of Major Goldsborough leaves but one survivor of the group of wounded Confederate officers who were in Widow Wible’s house near the battlefield of Gettysburg.

   “Lieutenant Colonel Herbert, the commander of the Second Maryland Infantry, was wounded severely on the evening of the second day’s battle.  The command had made a long charge, subject at first to the fire of the enemy’s artillery, which was handled with deadly precision, and, after a breathing spell while descending into the valley of Rock Creek, met the bullets of the enemy, as it rushed up the heights of Culp’s Hill.  The Union troops were behind a log parapet, breast high,  it’s _________ filled with stones.  The Marylanders charged to within a few feet of it but were delayed by the branches of trees which had been thrown in front and formed an effective chevaux de frise.   For some time they stood in the open and fired on the enemy behind their breastworks.  As darkness came on they lay down for a while to Avoid the terrific fire, then charged again and drove the enemy out of his works and were near the second line of defense when halted and called back.

   “ In the charge up the hill the gallant Herbert was wounded and the command devolved upon Major Goldsborough.  He commanded the battalion in the desperate charge of the next day when trees 18 inches thick were cut off by the bullets from the opposing lines and where Murray and so many gallant men fell.  He was desperately wounded and with Herbert and Lieutenant Barber and another was carried to the house I have mentioned and occupied the first floor.  There, under the skill of the Confederate surgeons, the kindness of the noble Baltimore women who nursed them and the freedom from survelliance which our friend the enemy left us, under a kind Providence, these desperately wounded men were won back to convalescence.

   “Lieutenant Barber, apparently the least wounded of the four, was the only one to die.   Major Goldsborough had a bullet wound immediately above his heart. Physically he was never the same man as before but he continued ever the gallant soldier who had won our youthful hearts by his wonderful bravery and enterprise in battle.

   “His battles are all over now.  His battle with life, the longest and perhaps the hardest, is ended.  May he have good rest upon the other shore.”

 

The (Baltimore) Sun, 29 December 1901

            WITH MILITARY HONORS

Major Goldsborough’s Body Buried In Loudon Park Cemetery

   Major William W. Goldsborough, the gallant Confederate officer who died on Christmas Day at his home in Philadelphia, was buried with military honors yesterday afternoon in the Confederate Plot in Loudon Park.  The body had been prepared for burial at the undertaking establishment of Henry W. Jenkins & Sons, Park avenue and Saratoga street, whence the funeral cortege proceeded.

   At the entrance to the cemetery a procession was formed.  In advance walked a fife and drum corps, followed by a battalion from the Fifth Regiment, under command of Capt. N. Lee Goldsborough, made up from members of the various companies composing the regiment.  Next came the honorary pallbearers followed by Rev. Dr. William M. Dame, rector of the Memorial Protestant Episcopal Church, chaplain of the Fifth Regiment.  The hearse and carriages came next, followed by delegations from the Society of the Army and Navy of the Confederate States in Maryland, the Union Veterans’ Association, the James R. Herbert Camp, United Confederate Veterans, and the survivors of the old Baltimore City Guard.  Mr James R. Wheeler of the Confederate Society, led the procession to the grave, which is near those of Col. Harry Gilmor, the famous Maryland Cavalry officer; Capt. James R. Herbert, who was a member of the same regiment with Major Goldsborough; Major J.B. Brockenbrough, who originated the Baltimore Light Artillery, and Capt. William H. Murray, a Maryland officer, who was killed at Gettysburg.  The colors of the Confederate Society, draped in black, were borne by Mr. Richard T. Knox.

   When the members of the Fifth Regiment had come to a  ______ near the grave the casket containing the body of Major Goldsborough was removed from the hearse and borne to the grave by the active pallbearers, all of whom were members of the James R. Herbert Camp.”  The simple burial service of the Protestant Episcopal Church was then read in a feeling and impressive manner by Rev. Dr. Dame.  At it’s conclusion three volleys were fired over the grave and the bugler sounded taps.

   Mrs. Louise Goldsborough, the widow of the deceased officer, stood near the grave bowed with grief.  She said it was her husband’s last wish that he be buried in the Confederate Plot beside his deceased comrades.

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

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William_Goldsmith

Sgt. William Goldsmith – [Plot C-101; Readable] ADOPTED

 

Died 10/19/1898. C-101. Age 75.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

WILLIAM GOLDSMITH

The (Baltimore) Sun, 24 October 1898

   William Goldsmith, a veteran of the Maryland Line, Confederate Soldiers’ Home, Pikesville, was buried Saturday morning from the home.  The body was conveyed to Loudon Park for interment in a car of the Consolidated Railway.

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

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Frank G. Goodwin – [Plot C-70; Barely Readable] ADOPTED

Goodwin_Frank_G_SM.jpg

 

Buried 7/21/1863, aged 19.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

8th GA.  US Civil War Soldiers 1861-1865, F.G. Goodwin, Confederate  GA,  8th GA Inf., Co. B

 

American Civil War Soldiers

F. Goodwin

Residence: Chatham Co., GA

Enlistment Date: 21 May 1861

Co. B, 8th Inf  Reg GA

Killed 2 July 1863 at Gettysburg, PA

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

F. G. Goodwin  (Confederate)

Enlistment:
- Residing in Chatham County, GA at time of enlistment
- Enlisted on May 21 1861 as Private

Mustering information:
- Enlisted into B Company, 8th Infantry (Georgia) on May 21 1861
- Killed while serving in 8th Infantry (Georgia) on Jul 2 1863 at Gettysburg, PA

Sources for the above information:
- Roster of Confederate Soldiers of Georgia 1861-1865, (Longino & Porter, 1955-58)

 

69) http://alexanderstreet.com/resources/civilwar.access.htm

 

 

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Pvt. R.W. Goodwin – [Plot A-44; Unreadable] ADOPTED

Goodwin_R_W(sm)

 

Buried 12/30/1863.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Dr. Benjamin Gough – [Plot D-58; Unreadable] ADOPTED

Gough_Benjamin(SM)

 

Pvt., Co. A, 1st Md. Inf. b. 1835. Clerk, age 25, St. Mary's Co., Md. 1850 census. On postwar roster. Reenl. Co. I, 4th Va. Cav. Sangster's Station 7/11/61. Detailed as Hospital Steward 1/14/62. Also served in 2nd Va. Cav. and Winder hospital, Richmond. Gd. Medical College of Va. during the war. M. D., Leonardtown, Md. Admitted Old Soldiers' Home, Pikesville, Md. 2/7/90. d. there 3/13/12. Bur. Loudon Park Cem., Baltimore. Also has marker in St. Andrews Cem., Leonardtown, Md.

 

23) Driver, Page 423

 

 

Benjamin Gough, M.D.

 

1835 – 1912

 

Dr. Benjamin Gough was brother of Dr. Richard T. Gough (1822 – 1886).  The Gough immigrant, William Gough, came to Maryland from England in 1673 and was commissioned as deputy surveyor by Baker Brooke, Esquire, surveyor General.  The family has been prominent in St. Mary’s Co. ever since.  Dr. Benjamin Gough was son of Bennett Gough and his wife, Ann L. Mills, of Medley’s Neck, south of Leonardtown.

 

He was in the Confederate Service from 1861 – 1865.  He served as a Private in Company I, 4th Virginia Cavalry.  He was transferred to the Hospital Corps in 1862 and studied medicine while the war was in progress.  He was later graduated from the Richmond Medical School.

 

No Record was found of a marriage.

 

Dr. Benjamin Gough was admitted to the Confederate Soldiers Home at Pikesville, Western Maryland on February 7, 1890.  The Confederate Soldiers Home Record Book (1911 – 1913) gives this account:

 

Wednesday, March 13, 1912, “Dr. Benjamin Gough is reported to be dying.  The man who sat up with him last night said he gave him 10 ounces of whiskey during the night.  Rain commenced falling about 8 a.m., and soon after breakfast, rained all morning – light rain.  Our late brother Dr. Benjamin Gough passed quietly away this afternoon at 4:45 p.m.  He was an invalid for many years, 4 or 5 I think.  This makes the third death of members of this Home for this year up to date.  (p. 71).

 

March 16, 1912:  Our late Brother Dr. Benjamin Gough was laid to rest yesterday afternoon in the Confederate Lot, Louden [sic] Park Cemetery.  Funeral services in the Relic Hall, Rev. G.M. Murray officiating clergyman of the P.E. Church.”  (p. 72).

 

Excerpt from Margaret K. Fresco's book, "Doctors of St. Mary's County."

 

25) Courtesy of Chris Clark, Indiana

 

Died 3/14/1912, aged 78.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Graham

Graham – [Plot D-29; Unreadable] ADOPTED

 

Buried 5/11/1862.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Pvt. Israel J. Graham – [Plot B-57; Barely Readable] ADOPTED

Graham_Israel_J(SM)

 

Buried 12/01/1908, aged 75.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

ISRAEL GRAHAM,  B-56, Co. A, 1st MD Cav

US Civil War Soldiers 1861-1865

Israel Graham

Confederate MD

1 MD Cav, Co. A

Rank in/out: Private

M379 Roll 1

 

US Civil War Soldiers 1861-1865

J. Graham

Confederate MD

1 MD Cav, Co. A

Rank in/out: Private

Alternate Name: Israel Graham

M379 Roll 1

 

American Civil War Soldiers

Israel Graham

Confederate MD

Private

Co. A, 1st Battn Cav. Reg. MD

 

US Civil War Soldiers Records and Profiles

Israel Graham

Private Maryland

Enlisted in Co. A, MD 1st Cav. Battn

Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records

 

US Civil War Soldiers 1861-1865

J. Graham

Confederate VA

7 VA Cav (Ashby’s Cav), Co. G

Rank in/out: Private

M382 Roll 22

 

US Civil War Soldiers Records and Profiles

Israel J. Graham

Enlisted 3 Jan 1862 as a Private at Winchester, VA.

Enlisted in co. A, MD 1st Cav Battn

Enlisted in Co. G, VA 7th Cav. Reg on 1 March 1862

The Virginia Regimental Histories Series

 

Civil War Prisoner of War Records

Graham, J., Pvt 1 Md Co A, captured Hanover Junct May 27, 1864. Released June 16, 1865

 

www.GenealogyBank.com, News Article, 6 December 1908

CONFEDERATE VETERANS DEAD

Israel Graham And James Lusby Answer The Last Roll

 

Two veterans died yesterday at the Confederate Soldiers’ Home, Pikesville.  They were Messrs. Israel Graham and James Lusby.

 

Mr. Graham was a native of Loudoun county, Virginia, and was 75 years old.  Enlisting at Winchester, Va., in Company G, Seventh Virginia Cavalry, he was transferred to Company A, First Maryland Cavalry.  He was captured in June 1864 and imprisoned at Elmira, N.Y. until after the war.  For years he was a travelling  salesman for Baltimore firms.

 

Mr. Lusby was born in Baltimore.  At the outbreak of the war he enlisted in Company F, First Maryland Infantry.  In 1862 he re-enlisted in the Stuart Horse Artillery and later he was transferred to the Maryland Line, serving in Company F., First Maryland Cavalry.

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

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James_W_Green

James W. Green – [B-79a; No Marker] ADOPTED

 

WIA, Gettysburg

 

43)  http://home.earthlink.net/~bklohr/BatteryRoster.htm

 

Died 6/29/1903, aged 61.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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Pvt. Mathew Green – [Plot H-05; Barely Readable] ADOPTED

 

Matthew_Green(sm)

Pvt., Co. D, 1st Md. Inf. b. Baltimore, Md., circa 1836. Res. of Baltimore. Enl. Harpers Ferry 6/1/61. Present 9-12/61. Present Port Republic 6/8/62. In Charlottesville hospital until discharged 8/62. Reenl. in Artillery and transf. 43rd Bn. Va. Cav. Issued clothing 4th Qtr., 1864. Paroled Winchester 4/22/65. Age 29, 5' 8 1/2", light complexion, brown hair, blue eyes. Member, Army & Navy Society, Maryland Line Association. Entered Old Soldiers' Home, Pikeville, Md. from Baltimore 1/3/93 age 57, Cigar Maker. d. there 12/21/04 age 69. Bur. Loudon Park Cem., Baltimore.

 

23) Driver, Page 425

 

Born at Baltimore City March 26, 1835. Enlisted May 1861 at Harpers Ferry in Company D, First Maryland Regiment Infantry for one year. Re-enlisted 1863 in Colonel Mosby’s command at Headquarters, Fauquair County, VA, for the war.

 

1) Toomey, Page 53

 

Died 12/21/1904, aged 69.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

MATHEW GREEN, H-05, Co. D, 1st MD Inf & Mosby’s Cav

 

US Civil War Soldiers 1861-1865

Matthew Green

Confederate MD

1 MD Inf. Co. D

Rank in/out: Private

M379 Roll 1

 

American Civil War Soldiers

Matthew Green

Confederate MD

Private in Co. D, 1st Inf. Reg. MD

 

1880 US Federal Census-PA-Phila-Phila.-D2

 

 

 

Green, Matthew

45

segar maker

MD IRE IRE

 

 

Green, Eliza

44

 

VA IRE NY

Wife

 

Green, Charles

19

Salesman

MD MD VA

Son

 

Green, Sarah

14

 

PA MD VA

Daughter

 

Green, Frank

12

Office boy

PA MD VA

Son

 

Green, Annie

10

 

PA MD VA

Daughter

 

Green, Mary

7

 

CT MD VA

Daughter

 

Green, John

7

 

MD MD VA

Son

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1900 US Federal Census-MD-Baltimore-Pikesville-ED3-D27

 

 

Maryland Line Confederate Soldiers’ Home

 

 

 

Green, Matthews

Soldier

Mar 1835

65

MD MD MD

inmate

 

The (Baltimore) Sun, 22 Dec 1904

MATTHEW GREEN

   Mr. Matthew Green, an ex member of Company D, First Maryland Infantry, and of Mosby’s Cavalry, died yesterday at the Confederate Soldiers’ Home, Pikesville.  He was 69 years old and was born in Baltimore.  A widow and three sons survive him.  The widow and two of the sons are living in Philadelphia, while another son is living Broolyn, N.Y.

   Mr. Green enlisted in the First Maryland Infantry at Harpers Ferry in 1861 for one year. In 1863 he enlisted in Mosby’s Cavalry at the headquarters in Fauquier county, Virginia.  He was in every engagement in which his command participated until he was wounded in the battle of Port Republic.  He was sent to the hospital at Charlottesville, but was paroled at Winchester with Mosby’s command after the surrender of Gen. Robert E. Lee.  He entered the home in 1893.

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

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Vincent_Green

Pvt. Vincent Green – [Plot C-36; Readable] ADOPTED

 

WIA, Fredericksburg

 

43)  http://home.earthlink.net/~bklohr/BatteryRoster.htm

 

Died 2/16/1919, aged 77.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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William_Oliver_Green

William Oliver Green – [Plot B-50; Barely Readable] ADOPTED

 

Pvt., Co. A, 1st Md. Inf. b. circa 1837. Res. of Cecil Co., Md. On postwar roster and Co. B, 2nd Va. Inf. Transf. Co. B, 1st Md. Cav. 10/1/62. Captured Old Church 3/2/64. Sent to Point Lookout. Exchanged 3/18/65. Paroled Greensboro, N.C. 5/9/65. Took oath 5/13/65. Res. of Kent Co., Md. Destination Kent Co., Md. Member, Army & Navy Society, Maryland Line Association 1907, res. of Newport News, Va. Entered Old Sol­diers' Home, Pikesville, Md. from Baltimore 2/5/07, age 70, Farmer. d. there 6/5/13. Bur. Loudon Park Cem., Balti­more.

 

23) Driver, Page 425

 

Died 6/05/1918, aged 76.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

WILLIAM OLIVER GREEN, B-50, Co. A, 1st MD Inf.

 

The (Baltimore) Sun, 6 June 1913-News Article

DEFENDER AT RICHMOND

William O. Green, Confederate Veteran, Dies At Home

HIS BURIAL MEMORIAL DAY

Exercises In Honor Of Old Warriors Of South To Be Held At Loudon Park Today

   When the deeds of Confederate soldiers are called to memory at 4 o’clock this afternoon in the lot of old soldiers’ at Loudon Park cemetery, there will be a fresh grave.

   William O. Green, the largest man in the Confederate Soldiers’ Home at Pikesville, who died Wednesday, was one of the most popular inmates.  His body will be buried this morning.  It was the hope of James R. Wheeler, chairman of the arrangements for the exercises, that the burial might take place at 4 o’clock, also, but this could not be done.  When a veteran died 15 years ago his funeral was held in connection with regular Memorial Day exercises.

   Mr. Green enlisted in the Confederate States Army, as private at Charlottesville, Va., Company D, First Maryland Cavalry.  He was captured in March 1864, in defense of Richmond, Va., was imprisoned at Point Lookout for twelve months and then sent across “the lines” to Camp Lee, to await exchange.  Mr. Green was on furlough in North Carolina when General Lee surrendered. He entered the home February 5, 1907.

   The decoration of Confederates’ graves is done solely by sympathizers with the “Lost Cause.”  Each year the program is about the same.  As many of the inmates of the home as possible attend while all the affiliated societies, including the Daughters of the Confederacy, form a procession at the main gate of the cemetery, marching to the lot where the exercises are held.  There will be about 400 persons in the procession, of whom about 50 will come from the home.

   “Sleep on, Oh, Happy Heroes” will be sung by a male chorus, under the direction of Frederick Furst. Prayer will be offered by Rev. Dr. William M. Dame, rector of Memorial Protestant Episcopal Church and an old soldier.  Congressman Frank Clark, of Florida, will make an address.

   “Sleep Comrades, Sleep” will be sung by the male chorus.  Miss Katie McWilliams will recite.  The male chorus will sing “Abide With Me” after which benediction will be pronounced and the services will be concluded by the singing of “Nearer My God, to Thee” by the audience, with the accompaniment of a band.

   There will be a liberal strewing of flowers on the graves by the members of the Daughters of the Confederacy and their friends, who take at least this one opportunity to show their admiration and respect for those who fought for the preservation of their commonwealths and the continuance of principles which they believed to be not only just but their inalienable right.

 

63) Courtesy Ms. Lisa Lockett

 

 

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G. Waters Greenburg – [Plot G-22; No Marker] ADOPTED

Greenburg_G_Waters(sm)

 

Reburied from Ft. McHenry, 1895.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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William_H_Greenfield

Pvt. William H. Greenfield – [Plot A-58; Barely Readable] ADOPTED

 

Cpl., Co. G, 1st Md. Inf. b. Md. circa 1839. Res. of Baltimore. Enl. Harpers Ferry 5/22/61 as Pvt. Present 9-12/61. Promoted Cpl. NFR. Reenl. C.S. Navy as Yeoman and served on C.S.S. Patrick Henry and Chickamauga. Served in Horse Artillery Battery, Charleston, S.C. Deserted to the enemy Charleston, S.C. 2/16/65. Took oath and released 3/13/65. Age 26, 5' 5", dark complex­ion, dark hair, dark eyes. Destination Baltimore. Member, Army & Navy Society, Maryland Line Association 1894, res. of Baltimore. d. 3/29/97. Bur. Loudon Park Cem., Baltimore.

 

23) Driver, Page 425

 

Died 3/29/1897, aged 55.

 

6) Records of Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland

 

 

 

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